Discount Offers

Personal Self Defence Spray UK's No1 Spray Legal Pepper Spray Clone UK Sale Only

£22.99
End Date: Saturday Nov-18-2017 9:46:38 GMT
Buy It Now for only: £22.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Monday Nov-20-2017 16:47:09 GMT
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Farb Gel UK Legal Self Defence Spray Personal Security Protection, Legal CS alt

£9.99
End Date: Tuesday Oct-24-2017 12:07:14 BST
Buy It Now for only: £9.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Monday Nov-20-2017 16:47:09 GMT
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
0024385
Visit Today : 1
Visit Yesterday : 1
This Month : 23
This Year : 296
Total Visit : 24385
Hits Today : 6895
Total Hits : 3384105
Who's Online : 1

united-kingdom

Barred security director to be sentenced at crown court and accomplice sentenced

On 12 October 2017, at Caernarfon Magistrates Court, Mark Pursglove was referred to the crown court to be sentenced for working without an SIA licence. Rachel Williams was sentenced for aiding and abetting offences. This sentencing follows the prosecution of Mark Pursglove and Rachel Williams on 14 September 2017. Mark Pursglove was prosecuted in 2016 because he had supplied unlicensed security operatives. Once his company was found guilty, Mark Pursglove continued to act as a director despite being unlicensed and positioned Rachel Williams as the frontwoman of the business to conceal this fact.

Our investigators inspected this further and based on intelligence built a case against Mark Pursglove and Rachel Williams. In this previous hearing, they were then found guilty at Llandudno Magistrates Court on 14 September. In the latest hearing, we made an application for the sentencing of Mark Pursglove to be committed to the Crown Court in order to pursue the confiscation of assets under the Proceeds of Crime Act (2002). As a result, the sentencing of Pursglove has been adjourned till November at Caernarfon Crown Court. Rachel Williams was sentenced and received a community order of 150 hours of unpaid work, to be completed within the next 12 months.

She was also ordered to pay 3,500 in costs and a victim surcharge of 85. Nathan Salmon, the Head of our Criminal Investigations Team, said:

The SIA will always determine who is actually responsible for committing an offence. Those guilty of offences cannot hide behind others. Using Rachel Williams to front his businesses did not protect Mark Pursglove from prosecution

This strong conviction highlights that security regulation exists in order to protect those who use contracted security services and the general public, and ensure, the effectiveness of security businesses that operate within the industry.

Further information:

  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

    The SIA is also on FacebookBarred Security Director To Be Sentenced At Crown Court And Accomplice Sentenced (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterBarred Security Director To Be Sentenced At Crown Court And Accomplice Sentenced (SIAuk).

Police to review Conservative security after Prime Minister prank

Police are to work with the Conservatives to review their conference security after a well-known comedian was able to hand the Prime Minister a mock P45 unemployment notice. Interrupting Theresa May’s keynote speech to Tory members in Manchester1, Lee Nelson – real name Simon Brodkin – approached the podium to hand the Prime Minister the fake document before being led away. Conservative MPs voiced their concerns over the prank, as party chairman Sir Patrick McLoughlin and Home Secretary Amber Rudd promised a full inquiry. “There should be some very serious questions – that could have been a terrorist,” said Tory MP George Freeman, the head of the Prime Minister’s policy board. A Conservative spokesman said: “In light of the arrest during the Prime Minister’s speech we are working with the police to review the accreditation process and security arrangements for party conference.”

Mr Brodkin, who has a history of interrupting high-profile events, was arrested “to prevent a breach of the peace” after being escorted out of the conference hall, but was later released. He was revealed to have had legitimate accreditation for the Conservative conference, believed to be a two-day delegate pass costing around 700. Greater Manchester Police chief superintendent John O’Hare said: “The man had legitimate accreditation which granted him access to the conference site.

“In light of this we will be reviewing the accreditation process with the Conservative Party. “Even with accreditation, everyone at the conference goes through airport-style searches before being allowed entry to the site.”

Security firm G4S defended themselves, using their Twitter account to reveal they were not the security provider for inside the auditorium but only the conference perimeter, entrances and exits. Mr Brodkin was given a conditional caution in March 2013 after warming up alongside Premier League footballers ahead of a Manchester City game at Everton. He was also arrested, but later released, when he threw money at world football boss Sepp Blatter in July 2015. A month earlier, Mr Brodkin stormed the stage during Kanye West’s set at Glastonbury festival.

References

  1. ^ Theresa May’s keynote speech to Tory members in Manchester (news.sky.com)

Here’s the latest security bug your computer could be exposed by

A newly discovered firmware vulnerability could leave countless Windows and Mac computers at risk from a hack, according to security researchers from Duo Labs1 . The vulnerability could be used by malware to gain deep access to systems. The bug involves the extensible firmware interface, or EFI, which is the first bit of code that runs when you hit the power button – part of its responsibilities include validating the software that’s running on the machine. Based on tests on 74,000 Apple Macs, the Duo Labs team found that the EFI firmware was not always being updated at the same time as the operating system, leaving a security hole that could potentially be exploited . The vulnerability could also affect Windows PCs, the researchers say2.

Risk assessment

The good news is that a hack taking advantage of the EFI vulnerability would need to be quite a complex one, and it’s only really worth the trouble if you’ve got some pretty important data locked away on your machine. What’s more, Duo Labs says it hasn’t spotted anyone actively making use of this security loophole yet – it’s working with Apple and other computer makers to get the bug patched. “For most people in most situations, the risk is currently not severe,” the researchers say. If you’re on a Mac machine, updating to the latest version of the software (macOS High Sierra) is enough to squash the vulnerability .

For more details about how the security vulnerability works and how to guard against an attack, see the Duo Labs blog3.

References

  1. ^ from Duo Labs (duo.com)
  2. ^ the researchers say (www.bbc.co.uk)
  3. ^ see the Duo Labs blog (duo.com)