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Indian security forces kill senior militant in India-controlled Kashmir

Noor Mohammad Tantray, a commander in the Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) group, was shot dead by Indian security forces during a fierce gunfight in Pulwama district, located 14.2 miles (23 kms) from the Himalayan state’s summer capital of Srinagar, on Tuesday night. Tantray, 47, was the operational chief of the Pakistan-based group for south Kashmir, according to Mohammad Zahid, the Pulwama district police superintendent.

Tantray was arrested in Delhi on charges in 2003 of conspiracy to carry out terrorist attacks and was sentenced to life imprisonment . He was released on parole in 2015, according to CNN affiliate CNN News 181.

“Noor went underground and soon became the key man of JeM in coordinating and organizing attacks at different places .. . He was wanted in (relation to) a number of terror offenses in south and central Kashmir,” police spokesman Manoj Pundita told CNN. Tantray was also believed to have been the mastermind behind an attack on a Border Security Force camp near Srinagar airport that left one soldier dead in October. At just 4 feet 3 inches (1.29m) Tantray was an instantly recognizable figure, something that police say could have attributed to his eventual death.

“He could easily get mixed up in a crowd without being noticed because of his shorter height . But at the same time, since his profile was very well known to the security agencies, his less than average height was also a disadvantage as he was easily identifiable,” said a senior police officer who wished to remain anonymous in Tantray’s hometown of Tral.

Who are Jaish-e-Mohammad

Jaish-e-Mohammed, which translates to the Army of the Prophet Mohammed, is a Pakistan-based militant separatist organization that operates on both sides of the border of the disputed state. The group, which has been designated a terrorist organization by the US State Department since 2001, seeks to unite the Indian controlled area of Kashmir with Pakistan. Along with a series of attacks in Kashmir, the group was blamed for a 2001 attack on the central parliament building in New Delhi, which left 13 people dead. Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, the terror group behind the deadly 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed 164 people, was also blamed for the attack. In July 2004, Pakistani authorities arrested a JeM member wanted in connection with the 2002 abduction and murder of American journalist Daniel Pearl. The death of Tantray is regarded as a major success for Indian security forces in their ongoing battle with Kashmir’s multiple separatist groups.

Violence in Kashmir has continued to flare up throughout 2017, following the death of Burhan Wani, a young militant leader in 2016. Wani, a member of the Hizbul Mujahideen militant group, was known for using social media to reach out to Kashmiri youth. His death sparked a new wave of unrest that claimed more than 90 civilian lives and left thousands wounded .

Scores were also partially or fully blinded by pellet guns, a controversial move adopted by Indian security forces to quell protests.

References

  1. ^ CNN News 18 (www.news18.com)

Nadine Dorries’ password sharing violates Parliament’s cyber security policy

Nadine Dorries password sharing among her staff is in violation of Parliament s cyber security policy. The Conservative MP revealed she shares her Parliamentary digital log ins with around four members of staff1 in order to handle the high volume of virtual correspondence she receives every day.

In common with other organisations, Parliament has a cyber security policy that applies to all users of its digital services, including Members, their staff and parliamentary staff, a Parliamentary spokesperson told i . In line with good practice, this policy includes a requirement not to share passwords.

Nadine Dorries' Password Sharing Violates Parliament's Cyber Security PolicyCyber security: not a Parliamentary concern, it would seem | Photo: PA

Ms Dorries made the comments on Twitter as she defended Damian Green, who is currently facing calls to step down as the investigation into whether he viewed pornography on his work laptop2 intensifies.

My staff log onto my computer on my desk with my login every day . Including interns on exchange programmes, she said . For the officer on BBC News just now to claim that the computer on Green s desk was accessed, and therefore it was Green is utterly preposterous! In response to an online backlash berating her for poor security practices, Ms Dorries attempted to downplay her importance in Westminster, adding: You don t have a team of four to six staff answering the 300 emails you receive every day.

Flattered by number of people on here who think I m part of the Government and have access to government docs .

I m a back bench MP two Westminster-based computers in a shared office, she later added.

On my computer, there is a shared email account . That s it . Nothing else . Sorry to disappoint ! All my staff have my login details . A frequent shout when I manage to sit at my desk myself is, what is the password?

Nadine Dorries' Password Sharing Violates Parliament's Cyber Security PolicyAmber Rudd: not a fan of encryption (Photo: Getty)

Fellow Tory MP Nick Boles weighed in to offer his support, adding I often forget my password and have to ask my staff what it is, while James Clayton, a producer for the BBC s Newsnight, claimed it is extremely common for MPs to share their parliamentary login details with their staff . The House of Commons was hit by a sustained cyber attack in June3, targeting MP accounts with weak passwords and blocking their owners from accessing them.

A handbook for MPs and their staff4 even explicitly states passwords should not be shared, a sentiment echoed by the House of Commons Staff Handbook on Information Security Responsibilities5. The same advice is recommended by cyber security experts the fewer people in possession of a password, the more secure the account will be.

The cyber security industry makes the point about human fallibility time and again for obvious reasons . Passwords tend to be one of the basics when training staff in cyber security and for good reason, as shared or re-used passwords create weaknesses in an organisations cyber defence, said Tony Pepper, chief executive of data security company Eggress.

From there, a creative attacker can move sideways through a network, implement phishing attacks or undertake any number of malicious actions .

An enterprise can deploy all the advanced tech it likes to track, stop and forensically analyse attacks but if people make mistakes, these are neutered.

References

  1. ^ shares her Parliamentary digital log ins with around four members of staff (inews.co.uk)
  2. ^ viewed pornography on his work laptop (inews.co.uk)
  3. ^ sustained cyber attack in June (inews.co.uk)
  4. ^ handbook for MPs and their staff (www.parliament.uk)
  5. ^ House of Commons Staff Handbook on Information Security Responsibilities (www.parliament.uk)

Republic vows to oppose amnesty for Troubles security forces

  • Republic vows to oppose amnesty for Troubles security forces

    BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

    The Irish government will oppose any form of amnesty for security force members as part of measures to address the legacy of the Troubles. https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/republic-vows-to-oppose-amnesty-for-troubles-security-forces-36342375.html

    https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/article36342373.ece/2cacf/AUTOCROP/h342/2017-11-22_new_36441499_I2.JPG

  • Email1

The Irish government will oppose any form of amnesty for security force members as part of measures to address the legacy of the Troubles. Dublin last night pledged to challenge the statute of limitations proposal which is to be floated in a British Government public consultation document.

Human rights and victims groups also came out strongly against the move. An Irish Department of Foreign Affairs spokesman warned it would “not look favourably” on any form of amnesty for security forces or paramilitaries.

“There are no amnesties from prosecution provided for in the Good Friday Agreement or any subsequent agreements including the Stormont House Agreement,” he said.

“The government’s position is and will remain that the rule of law, including the requirement under Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights, for effective investigations of unlawful killings, must be upheld by all responsible authorities.” Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams accused London of an “act of bad faith” and said neither his party nor the Irish government had been consulted about the proposal while the SDLP and Alliance also voiced their opposition. Amnesty International said any statute of limitations imposed to block investigations for killings or torture carried out by the security forces would be “an utter betrayal of victims’ fundamental rights to justice”.

Relatives For Justice said the proposal was “a slap in the face to victims of state violence – it once again casts them as second class citizens”. A range of mechanisms to deal with the Troubles legacy were agreed by the parties in the 2014 Stormont House Agreement – an amnesty was not among them. The agreed proposals included a new independent investigatory unit, a truth recovery body and an oral archive.

They were put on hold due to ongoing political disagreement with republicans fearing the UK Government would cite national security as a reason to withhold documents from victims’ families. Secretary of State James Brokenshire announced in September that he was planning to launch a public consultation exercise in an attempt to move the situation on. It was expected to focus on the Stormont House Agreement mechanisms, but Sinn Fein emerged from its meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May (above) yesterday claiming that a new statute of limitation proposal had been inserted into the consultation document.

A Northern Ireland Office spokesman said the Government believed the Stormont House Agreement proposals still represented the “best means” to address legacy issues. However, he said that for it to be an “open and meaningful consultation” the public should have its say on alternative approaches, such as the statute of limitations proposal. Support for an amnesty is strong among DUP and Tory MPs . However, UUP MLA Doug Beattie (inset) said legal experts believed it would “inevitably have to be extended to cover all Troubles-related deaths and open the door to a general amnesty for everyone, including terrorists”.

He added: “We need to be very careful that in our desire to prevent former police officers and soldiers from being the victims of a witch hunt, we do not inadvertently open the door to an amnesty for the very terrorists they risked their lives to defeat.”

SDLP MLA Dolores Kelly added: “The British Government cannot allow any amnesty for any violent perpetrators.

“Victims and survivors of the Troubles deserve truth and justice . The British state and others must deliver that justice .

No-one should be off-limits to the rule of law.” Alliance Leader Naomi Long said: “Justice and the rule of law cannot be adjusted to make people differently accountable for their actions.

“In all cases, we should follow the evidence to wherever that leads.

“Members of the armed forces should be treated exactly the same as anyone else in a similar situation.”

Belfast Telegraph

References

  1. ^ Email (www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk)