Discount Offers

Farb Gel UK Legal Self Defence Spray Personal Security Protection, Legal CS alt

£8.99
End Date: Monday Jun-26-2017 12:07:14 BST
Buy It Now for only: £8.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Armband ID SIA License Holder Bulk Buy x 50

£76.80
End Date: Sunday Jul-2-2017 21:52:54 BST
Buy It Now for only: £76.80
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Personal Self Defence Spray UK's No1 Spray Legal Pepper Spray Clone UK Sale Only

£19.99
End Date: Friday Jul-21-2017 10:46:38 BST
Buy It Now for only: £19.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Tactical ID Arm Band Security ID Badge Card Holder Doorman Armband SIA New

£2.49
End Date: Friday Jun-30-2017 11:47:24 BST
Buy It Now for only: £2.49
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
0024263
Visit Today : 1
Visit Yesterday : 1
This Month : 23
This Year : 174
Total Visit : 24263
Hits Today : 2801
Total Hits : 2327223
Who's Online : 1

markets

Islamist militants rapidly increasing in Sweden

STOCKHOLM The number of Islamist militants in Sweden has soared to thousands in recent years but only a few pose a security threat to society, the head of the country’s security services said on Friday.

Sweden is still in shock after five people were killed and 15 injured when a hijacked truck ploughed into a crowd on a busy shopping street and crashed into a Stockholm department store on April 7.

Police are holding an Uzbek man who has admitted to driving the vehicle.

Anders Thornberg, the head of the Swedish Security Service (Sapo), said only a handful of militants had the desire and capacity to carry out attacks . He blamed propaganda by Islamic State for the problem.

“We have never seen anything like this before,” Thornberg told national news agency TT.

He said the numbers included those who merely sympathise with violent militants to those who spread the message, recruit and collect funds.

“The growth in extremism is a challenge of historical proportions,” he said.

The biggest concentrations of militants are in Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmo and Orebro, according to Sapo.

The government has tightened laws and promised more funding for police and security services . It is planning further measures, including increased CCTV surveillance.

But Thornberg said the security services faced a new environment where attacks no longer needed months of planning and preparation.

“Today, if you decide to act, you maybe buy two knives or hire a truck and drive into a crowd,” he said.

(Reporting by Simon Johnson, editing by Pritha Sarkar)

China activists fear increased surveillance with new security law

BEIJING Chinese activists say they fear intensified state surveillance after a draft law seeking to legitimise monitoring of suspects and raid premises was announced last week, the latest step to strengthen Beijing’s security apparatus.

Half a dozen activists contacted by Reuters say they already face extensive surveillance by security agents and cameras outside their homes . Messages they post on social media, including instant messaging applications like WeChat are monitored and censored, they said.

The draft of a new law to formally underpin and possibly expand China’s intelligence gathering operations at home and abroad was released on May 16.

However, the law was vaguely worded and contained no details on the specific powers being granted to various state agencies.

“State intelligence work should…provide support to guard against and dispel state security threats (and) protect major national interests,” the document said.

The law will give authorities new legal grounds to monitor and investigate foreign and domestic individuals and bodies in order to protect national security, it said.

Public consultation for the draft ends on June 4 . It is unclear when the final version may be passed.

Hu Jia, a well-known dissident, said the release was met with fear and despair in his circle of reform-minded activists, where it was seen as a sign of strengthening resolve in the ruling Communist Party to crush dissent.

“Before, the party acted in secret, but now they have confidence to openly say: ‘We are watching you’,” Hu told Reuters.

“The law is also partly to frighten people ahead of the 19th Party Congress; to tell them to be careful, to be quiet,” he added . Hu was referring to the once in five years congress of the Communist Party likely to be held in October or November in which President Xi Jinping is likely to further cement his hold on power by appointing allies into the party’s inner core.

Xi became head of a newly established national security commission in 2013 and has since overseen a raft of legislation to expand legal rights and obligations for the security apparatus in the name of safeguarding China.

Western governments and rights activists say these measures shrink the space for independent civil society in China . Beijing says that the measures are warranted given its security concerns.

The draft proposes to give state security agencies “broad authority to question anyone, read or collect any material, and install surveillance devices or set up on-site posts inside any office or commercial building,” Hong Kong-based advocacy group the Network of Human Rights Defenders said in a statement.

VENEER OF LEGALITY

The Ministry of State Security, China’s main intelligence agency, could not be reached for comment as it does not have a publicly available telephone number or website.

“The (intelligence law) draft, like the National Security Law (passed in 2014), seems set to give the veneer of legality to intrusive and repressive surveillance activities,” said Eva Pils, an expert on Chinese criminal law at King’s College London.

The draft gives “very broad definitions of the remit of the law, including everything from threats to national security to promoting the welfare of the people, meaning that essentially anything could be considered to require intelligence-gathering,” she said.

Wang Qiaoling, the wife of prominent rights lawyer Li Heping who was handed a three year suspended sentence in April for subversion, told Reuters she has been constantly monitored since Li was detained two years ago.

“At the time, I arranged by phone calls and on WeChat to meet with two lawyers who would represent my husband, but on the day we arranged to meet, they were both blocked at home by public security agents,” she said.

“This was when I realised all my communication was being monitored,” she added.

Almost all families of the dozens of lawyers and activists who were detained in a 2015 crackdown faced similarly pervasive surveillance measures, she said.

“Once, last year, when they tried to stop me leaving my home, I told them: ‘You know that this is illegal ?

There is no legal procedure for what you are doing.’,” Wang said. “State security wilfully interpreting the law, this is a very scary thing.”

(Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan)

Roses in hand, Venezuelan women protesters face security forces

CARACAS Dressed in white and chanting “Liberty!”, tens of thousands of women opposed to Venezuela’s socialist President Nicolas Maduro marched on Saturday, proffering roses to security forces who blocked their way.

The women’s marches, which took place in most major cities around the South American oil producer, were the latest in five weeks of sustained protests against Maduro whom opponents decry as a dictator who has ruined the economy.

In Caracas, marchers sang the national anthem and shouted “We want elections!” They were halted at various points by lines of policewomen and National Guard troops with armoured cars.

The opposition, which has majority support in Venezuela after years of being in the shadow of the ruling Socialist Party, is demanding that delayed state elections be held and the 2018 presidential vote be brought forward.

They also want the government to free scores of jailed activists, allow humanitarian aid from abroad to offset a brutal economic crisis, and respect the independence of the legislature where the opposition won a majority in 2015.

Highlighting vandalism and violence by young masked protesters, Maduro says opponents are seeking a coup with U.S . support and harbour “terrorists” and “murderers” in their ranks.

In response to the crisis, the 54-year-old successor to Hugo Chavez is setting up a super body known as a “constituent assembly” with powers to rewrite the constitution, shake up public powers, and potentially replace the legislature.

“This march is against opposition terrorism, they are destroying everything,” said cook Fredesvilda Paulino, 54, at a pro-government rally also in Caracas on Saturday where red-shirted women waved pro-Maduro flags and banners.

The women’s marches were organised as part of an opposition attempt to vary tactics and keep momentum against Maduro.

Women have often been feeling the brunt of Venezuela’s economic crisis due to widespread food and medicine shortages, huge lines at shops, soaring prices, and increasing hunger in the nation of 30 million people.

THIRTY-SEVEN DEATHS

Since the anti-Maduro protests began in early April, at least 37 people have died, with victims including supporters of both sides, bystanders and members of the security forces.

Opposition leaders say the constituent assembly is a biased mechanism designed to keep an unpopular leader in power.

They say the government is to blame for violence by young protesters as authorities are refusing a free vote to resolve the crisis and are needlessly blocking and repressing marches.

“Just let us vote, and this will all end,” said teacher Anlerisky Rosales, 22, in the opposition women’s march in Caracas. “There is too much suffering in Venezuela . If we have to, we will give our lives in the street until Maduro goes.”

Various female protesters marched topless with black face masks in mourning for the fatalities.

At one point, a female government official emerged from the security lines to receive a petition and talk with the demonstration leaders.

With Maduro’s approval ratings at around 24 percent – less than half the level at the time of his narrow election victory in 2013 – and Venezuela suffering a fourth year of harrowing recession, the opposition’s challenge is to keep up street pressure and draw in support from poor former “Chavista” sectors.

Officials are hoping they become exhausted and disillusioned, while highlighting the violence of young opposition hotheads to try to discredit the whole opposition.

Many Venezuelans are closely watching the armed forces, who have the potential to tip the balance if they disobey government instructions or give Maduro a nudge behind the scenes.

Top armed forces officials have been pledging loyalty in public, though opposition leader Henrique Capriles said on Friday that 85 military officials had been arrested for dissent.

(Additional reporting by Deisy Buitrago in Caracas, Anggy Polanco in San Cristobal, Maria Ramirez in Ciudad Guayana; Editing by Matthew Lewis)