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Security review after drone lands on Queen Elizabeth deck

Published: 12:15 Saturday 12 August 2017

Security is under review after an amateur photographer managed to land a drone on the deck of Britain s newest aircraft carrier. The 70,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth – the largest warship in the Royal Navy – was docked in Invergordon in the Highlands when the drone was flown close to the carrier last month. The tiny aircraft then landed itself on the deck of the 3 billion vessel after sensing a high wind risk. The anonymous photographer – a member of the Black Isle Images amateur photography group – said he was surprised to have been unchallenged, even when he reported the incident to armed guards at the dock. The drone pilot told BBC Scotland: I could have carried two kilos of Semtex and left it on the deck. I could have been anybody . It was like a ghost ship.

READ MORE: 3bn HMS Queen Elizabeth vulnerable to low-cost missiles 1 The photographer took the oppportunity to take footage of the new aircraft carrier when it arrived in Invergordon last month, piloting his DJI Phantom drone from the other side of the Cromarty Firth. The drone was equiped with anti-crash sensors which automatically land the aircraft if it is in danger.

The non-slip coating of the carrier s deck allowed the drone – which usually avoids steel structures – to touch down . The drone pilot then took a photograph and managed to take off again. A spokesman for the Ministry of Defence said: We take the security of HMS Queen Elizabeth very seriously.

This incident has been reported to Police Scotland, an investigation is under way and we stepped up our security measures in light of it.


References

  1. ^ link to article (www.scotsman.com)

Companies warned over cyber security risk

A fast-growing Edinburgh-based fintech company aims to uncover key concerns around the evolving cyber threat landscape in Scotland at an event on the sector being held in Glasgow this week. The Future of Cyber Security Scotland Conference is taking place on Thursday and issues lined up for discussion include reducing risk and ensuring compliance, data breaches on the so-called dark web and encouraging a better gender balance in the industry. Among speakers and panellists are Don Randall, former head of security and chief information security officer of the Bank of England, and Alisdair Matheson, partner at law firm Brodies. Also on the list is Stephen Budd, product manager specialising in data solutions at cyber security specialist ZoneFox, a spin-out from Edinburgh Napier University. The firm s founder and chief executive Jamie Graves told Scotland on Sunday: As a Scottish company, I am delighted that we are able to partner with the conference to share knowledge across the cyber community in Scotland and educate on the best strategies and technologies to identify threats and reduce risk. Failure to protect sensitive information in the current business climate has serious consequences from reputational damage to huge financial loss, to the fallout for individuals that comes with the leak of their personal information. The firm will discuss whether Scotland is ready for general data protection regulation (GDPR), which comes into force in 2018 and will impose strict new rules on the way organisations collect, store and use personal data.

A recent study found that nearly half of UK firms were not ready for it coming into effect. Graves added that with the forthcoming GDPR, pressure has never been so high on organisations to safeguard their data and monitor its movement. As well as the increasing amount of state attacks and large organisations being breached, there have never been more attacks on businesses by cyber-criminals than we are seeing today, but, worryingly, knowledge and awareness about how to prevent such attacks is still very low. ZoneFox will present to delegates on the likes of how user behaviour analytics and machine learning can highlight threats to an organisation before they turn into incidents . Police Scotland, one of the conference s backers, said this month that there have been 34 ransomware attacks in Scotland in the past year, including 13 on NHS health boards on 13 May.

The conference s organiser is OSP Security Professionals, which last year took the Global Security & Cyber summit to Aberdeen, where it was predicted that oil and gas and the NHS were perfect targets for cyber hacks .

UK security forces ‘foiled 13 terror attacks since 2014’

Security services have thwarted 13 potential terrorist attacks on the UK in less than four years and are running more than 500 live investigations at any time, Britain s most senior counter-terrorism officer has revealed. Assistant commissioner Mark Rowley disclosed the figures as he launched a major appeal for the public to report any suspicions and act on their instincts, saying their help is critical to foiling atrocities. The Metropolitan Police officer said that since June 2013, police and intelligence agencies have disrupted 13 terrorist attack plots . Information from members of the public has contributed to stopping some of those attacks, while figures show it has assisted counter-terrorism police in a third of the most high-risk investigations. Describing the contribution as extraordinary , Mr Rowley said: Some of that information is a change in someone s behaviour, some of that s about suspicious activity. Sometimes that public information has actually started an investigation . Other times it s part way through and it corroborates some things or adds to things we already know.

The public are making a great contribution which is critical to us all working together to protect ourselves from terrorism. Despite foiling a string of plots since the murder of Lee Rigby in May 2013, the senior officer stressed that the threat continues to be severe while authorities have some big operational challenges. Investigators have been making arrests at a rate of close to one a day on average since 2014 .

The official threat level for international terrorism has stood at severe meaning an attack is highly likely for more than two years. Mr Rowley said that tempo of activity continues . He identified a host of challenges including encrypted communication methods, propaganda and the range of possible attack methods.

Now we worry about everything from fairly simple attacks with knives or using vehicles all the way through to the more complex firearms attacks, he said.

All of that means that our job remains difficult .

We ve got over 500 investigations at any one stage.