Discount Offers

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Thursday Sep-21-2017 17:47:09 BST
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Security Patrol Police Army Cadet Boot Size 8

£35.99
End Date: Saturday Sep-16-2017 12:07:14 BST
Buy It Now for only: £35.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Bomber Jacket Black Bouncer Security Door Supervisor

£35.99
End Date: Thursday Sep-21-2017 17:26:22 BST
Buy It Now for only: £35.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Thursday Sep-21-2017 17:47:09 BST
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
0024324
Visit Today : 1
Visit Yesterday : 1
This Month : 23
This Year : 235
Total Visit : 24324
Hits Today : 4986
Total Hits : 2871813
Who's Online : 1

ICOM

Europe’s cities have got used to increased security threat

Europe’s cities have had to get used to the fact that, of late, the terror threat they face has increased both in size and complexity. The atrocities in Barcelona and Cambrils1 are the latest examples of this. The continent’s police and security agencies have long known that the demise of the so-called Islamic State would signal an increase in the tempo of attacks, and definitely not an end to the threat of Islamist extremists. Three attacks in the UK in as many months were the first indication of the nightmare scenario they feared; that the leaders of this rapidly disintegrating so-called caliphate would compel their footsoldiers to launch attacks across the West. After all, the model for this kind of scenario played out more than a decade ago, when the most feared terror group at that time, al Qaeda, felt the full wrath of coalition airstrikes and ground operations.

Al Qaeda’s leaders urged their followers to strike back – and they duly did, launching attacks in London in 2005 and here in Spain in the capital, Madrid, a year earlier. For the security services, the complicating factor this time around is not just that IS has fully trained killing machines who have trodden the battlefields of Syria and Iraq. The terror group has an even larger army of “sleeper” extremists in towns and cities across the European continent and beyond. Most of these radicalised individuals – 3,500 in the UK alone – have never even been to the Middle East . They learned their deadly craft online. And increasingly they have turned to a less sophisticated, but just as deadly, mode of attack. What do we mean by less sophisticated ?

Vehicles and knives . Essentially everyday items that were never meant to murder or maim. Security sources have told me that they face a two-pronged threat. Alongside those battle-hardened jihadis are the violent wannabe jihadis who lack the skills, but are just as determined to inflict their brand of misery – often on their own communities. Authorities here in Spain and elsewhere in Europe have noticed an alarming increase in the number of those who seem to choose the path of violence.

Most of these plots get disrupted before they have a chance to kill and injure innocent civilians, but sadly some slip through the net.

The unfortunate truth here, is that a net increase in plots will result in a net increase in successful attacks.

References

  1. ^ Barcelona and Cambrils (news.sky.com)

Europe’s cities face threat of ‘sleeper’ extremists

Europe’s cities have had to get used to the fact that, of late, the terror threat they face has increased both in size and complexity. The atrocities in Barcelona and Cambrils1 are the latest examples of this. The continent’s police and security agencies have long known that the demise of the so-called Islamic State would signal an increase in the tempo of attacks, and definitely not an end to the threat of Islamist extremists. Three attacks in the UK in as many months were the first indication of the nightmare scenario they feared; that the leaders of this rapidly disintegrating so-called caliphate would compel their footsoldiers to launch attacks across the West. After all, the model for this kind of scenario played out more than a decade ago, when the most feared terror group at that time, al Qaeda, felt the full wrath of coalition airstrikes and ground operations.

Al Qaeda’s leaders urged their followers to strike back – and they duly did, launching attacks in London in 2005 and here in Spain in the capital, Madrid, a year earlier. For the security services, the complicating factor this time around is not just that IS has fully trained killing machines who have trodden the battlefields of Syria and Iraq. The terror group has an even larger army of “sleeper” extremists in towns and cities across the European continent and beyond. Most of these radicalised individuals – 3,500 in the UK alone – have never even been to the Middle East . They learned their deadly craft online. And increasingly they have turned to a less sophisticated, but just as deadly, mode of attack. What do we mean by less sophisticated ?

Vehicles and knives . Essentially everyday items that were never meant to murder or maim. Security sources have told me that they face a two-pronged threat. Alongside those battle-hardened jihadis are the violent wannabe jihadis who lack the skills, but are just as determined to inflict their brand of misery – often on their own communities. Authorities here in Spain and elsewhere in Europe have noticed an alarming increase in the number of those who seem to choose the path of violence.

Most of these plots get disrupted before they have a chance to kill and injure innocent civilians, but sadly some slip through the net.

The unfortunate truth here, is that a net increase in plots will result in a net increase in successful attacks.

References

  1. ^ Barcelona and Cambrils (news.sky.com)

Security review after drone lands on Queen Elizabeth deck

Published: 12:15 Saturday 12 August 2017

Security is under review after an amateur photographer managed to land a drone on the deck of Britain s newest aircraft carrier. The 70,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth – the largest warship in the Royal Navy – was docked in Invergordon in the Highlands when the drone was flown close to the carrier last month. The tiny aircraft then landed itself on the deck of the 3 billion vessel after sensing a high wind risk. The anonymous photographer – a member of the Black Isle Images amateur photography group – said he was surprised to have been unchallenged, even when he reported the incident to armed guards at the dock. The drone pilot told BBC Scotland: I could have carried two kilos of Semtex and left it on the deck. I could have been anybody . It was like a ghost ship.

READ MORE: 3bn HMS Queen Elizabeth vulnerable to low-cost missiles 1 The photographer took the oppportunity to take footage of the new aircraft carrier when it arrived in Invergordon last month, piloting his DJI Phantom drone from the other side of the Cromarty Firth. The drone was equiped with anti-crash sensors which automatically land the aircraft if it is in danger.

The non-slip coating of the carrier s deck allowed the drone – which usually avoids steel structures – to touch down . The drone pilot then took a photograph and managed to take off again. A spokesman for the Ministry of Defence said: We take the security of HMS Queen Elizabeth very seriously.

This incident has been reported to Police Scotland, an investigation is under way and we stepped up our security measures in light of it.


References

  1. ^ link to article (www.scotsman.com)