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Asda shoplifter jailed after chasing supermarket security guard with knife

A shoplifter who chased after a supermarket security guard with a knife when he was caught stealing booze has been locked-up. John Spedding was spotted pocketing a bottle of sambuca from Asda, in Hebburn1, and was followed out of the store by the guard. But when he was confronted outside and asked for the alcohol back, the 22-year-old pulled out a Stanley knife and chased the security guard down nearby Aln Street.

The terrified worker told police his life flashed before his eyes as he feared he would be stabbed if he was caught.

Newcastle Crown Court2 heard Spedding came to within a metre of the guard before stopping his pursuit after he was distracted by someone he knew. The police were called and Spedding was aggressive and violent with officers before biting one of them on the leg, prosecutors said. Now, the thief, of Bishop Crescent, Jarrow, has been jailed for 18 months after he admitted threatening a person with a bladed article, theft and assaulting a police officer.

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Paul Rowland, prosecuting, said Spedding was spotted picking-up the sambuca and leaving the Asda store on the afternoon of September 5 this year. The guard followed him outside and asked for the alcohol back when he discovered him hiding behind a vehicle in the car park. Mr Rowland said: At that point, the defendant placed the bottle on the ground and removed a craft or Stanley knife from his left pocket and the blade was showing and he said f****** come one then .

The security guard was terrified . He simply said to the defendant Keep it, keep it , referring to the alcohol . But, the defendant began to advance towards him .

At that point, the security guard began to run away.

He ran along Aln street to try and get away from the defendant . He did turn around at one point and saw the defendant still chasing him with the knife in his hand about 1m from him.

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The court was told Spedding was then distracted by someone he knew and stopped the chase, allowing the security guard to run back to the store and alert the police. But, officers were already on their way to the scene after being called by a concerned member of public and Spedding was arrested in a nearby park, where he d tried to dump the knife and booze.

Mr Rowland said Spedding then lashed out while being restrained and bit a police officer s leg when he was taken to a cell at the police station. Locking him up, Judge Amanda Rippon said: You were drunk at the time you committed this offence and you not only produced a knife but you chased your victim, who was doing no more than his duty as a security guard, down a public street, in full view of members of the public.

In a victim statement he said this left him shaken up, his life flashed before his eyes and he genuinely believed, not surprisingly, if you caught him, and you got within a meter of him, that you would have stabbed him. Vic Laffey, mitigating, said Spedding was drunk at the time and was now remorseful.

He added; He does not recall an awful lot about the incident because of the alcohol situation .

He has expressed a desire to apologise to those he has caused distress to as a result of the incident.

References

  1. ^ in Hebburn (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  2. ^ Newcastle Crown Court (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)

I’m stumped

I'm StumpedI’m grand with the rest of my law degree but one question gets me, I don’t know what to say… outline the role of the judiciary in the legal system, identify one argument for and against the contention that judges create law… My answer is Our law is a combination of legislation (created by parliament in the form of statutes) and common law (created when Judges interpret the law and add further definition to it.

Sometimes this is called “case law.” A good eg is the Offences Against the Person Act 1861. The parliament-made legislation sets out the main criminal offences of assault, battery, ABH and GBH. However, the meaning of “assault” has been interpreted by judges in various cases over the years e.g. R v Ireland, Burstow (1997). Some criminal offences aren’t set out in any legislation e.g. Murder, which is a common law offence – there is no piece of legislation which states that it is an offence to murder someone. Instead, the offence of murder was created by judges in how they interpreted general law and custom.

Id like your input.

This really has me stumped.

Read the original post:
I’m stumped

Cyber security: threats and responses

Cyber Security: Threats And Responses

During the C-Tech Cyber Security Forum delegates heard from experts who addressed the widespread assumptions of cyber terror, the best defences, preparation and response techniques for the media and broadcasting industry. The likelihood of accelerated attacks going into 2018, is high, delegates heard, with the pace of digital transformation among OTT providers and digital distributors meaning there is lack of understanding around secure procedures and data protection.

There is a threat to media and broadcasting companies on a scale that we have never seen before – Spencer Stephens

Production and Media Technology Expert Spencer Stephens spoke to IBC365 about the impact of cyber security on the broadcasting industry. He said: First of all, accepting and ensuring senior management buy into the fact that the attacks are going to happen is incredibly important.

The pace is increasing, Stephens told IBC365.

We ve seen the availability of so many tools that make it less of a skilled exercise . Whether it s a breach of the CIA tools or whether it is the impact of starting to see malware as a service . Rather than themselves attacking anybody, they become a service offering for people who want to do it.

Stephens, who chaired the inaugural cyber security C-Tech Forum, said: What we are looking at here is an across the board threat to media and broadcasting companies on a scale that we have never seen before. An active defence is critical, he said: There are precedents for how you react at what point do you shoot back ? Cyber warfare is incredibly complicated, anybody who is not prepared for cyber attacks is really not understanding what is going on in the world.

For broadcasters, the potential breach of data and cyber threats can cause irrevocable damage to their reputation as well as legal implications. Stephens explained payment of ransom doesn t mean the hackers will comply with their demands and you could invariably be helping to fund terrorism.

There is a general principle that paying ransom money only inspires more people to do it.

What we learnt from the attack on the post house that led to the comprise of Netflix s Orange is the New Black is that paying the ransom doesn t always work . That content was released anyway, Stephens said.

The media sector is increasingly becoming a target to cyber criminals, DPP Managing Director Mark Harrison told delegates at IBC2017 during the panel discussion Safety in Numbers: Collaborating against cyber attacks . Joined by experts from across the broadcast industry production and supply chain, the resounding statements concluded due diligence must be exerted and common-sense practices need to be executed with complete awareness company-wide.

Arqiva Chief Information Security Officer Denis Onuoha said: Cyber security is the same as health and safety in this day and age. The Digital Production Partnership (DPP) launched at IBC2017 the Committed to Security Programme to help companies apply best security practices across production and broadcast environments. DPP MD Mark Harrison said: As concern about cyber security grows there have been repeated calls for more consistent practice regarding security measures.

But without a common frame of reference, this has been difficult for suppliers . The DPP s Committed to Security Programme establishes such a best practice framework.

No scheme can ever guarantee the removal of all cybersecurity breaches, Harrison said.

But by displaying the DPP Committed to Security logo companies are indicating to their customers that they are addressing cybersecurity in a structured fashion .

This is particularly important in multi-vendor environments where continuous change also requires continuous vigilance.