Discount Offers

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Tuesday Aug-22-2017 17:47:09 BST
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Security Patrol Police Army Cadet Boot Size 8

£35.99
End Date: Saturday Sep-16-2017 12:07:14 BST
Buy It Now for only: £35.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Combat Trousers Security Bouncer Police Security Door Supervisor

£19.19
End Date: Tuesday Aug-22-2017 17:47:09 BST
Buy It Now for only: £19.19
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Bomber Jacket Black Bouncer Security Door Supervisor

£35.99
End Date: Tuesday Aug-22-2017 17:26:22 BST
Buy It Now for only: £35.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
0024323
Visit Today : 1
Visit Yesterday : 1
This Month : 22
This Year : 234
Total Visit : 24323
Hits Today : 6971
Total Hits : 2865790
Who's Online : 1

faith

Staffordshire County Show opens with increased security and a …

Comments (0) 1

SECURITY has been tightened at this year’s Staffordshire County Show but funseekers have flocked there in their thousands to soak up an action-packed two days in the sun. The two-day rural celebration at Staffordshire County Showground, near Stafford, opened its gates today to visitors from across the country and many showed up earlier than in previous years to make the most of the good weather and the many shows within the main event. Show organisers from Staffordshire and Birmingham Agricultural Society have worked with Staffordshire Police to increase security measures in the wake of last week’s bombing in Manchester and the 100 acre showground is covered by more than 40 CCTV cameras. The national security threat was raised to critical following the attack at Manchester Arena, but lowered to severe earlier this week, and police presence was stepped up at Staffordshire tourist attractions including Trentham Gardens. Staffordshire County Showground chief executive Richard Williams said: “We have put on extra security and bag checks on arrival at the showground . We have metal detectors that are being used as well, extra foot patrols by uniformed police and sniffer dogs. “On top of that we have our own security patrols .

The police have been very supportive and I think the show is as safe as it can be.” The events of last week failed to deter families from turning up in force for the show’s first day however . The show, in its 217th year, coincides with the half term school holiday and is packed with activities for visitors of all ages, from woodland crafts and animal encounters to a traditional Punch and Judy show and thrilling stunts in the main ring from the Bolddog Lings motorcycle display team. The half term break also enabled St Joseph’s College pupil Dan Weaver, 15, from Stone, to exhibit Holstein calves at the show with friend Joel Dart, 16, also from Stone. The Weaver family, of Aston Pool Farm, have taken part in a first for the show video cattle judging . The move was introduced in some cattle classes this year to enable farmers who may be otherwise unable to attend for reasons such as staffing or TB movement restrictions to showcase their animals. In total 35 animals were videoed on their farms ahead of today’s judging and the footage was broadcast in one of the livestock rings. Dan said: “I watched a bit of the video footage and it was good to see quite a few people who have never shown here before, hopefully it will encourage them to come to the show.” Another return visitor to the County Show was John Hartley, of Leek-based business Farm to Shop, who was selling a variety of cheeses in the food hall and cookery theatre.

He said: “This is our third year here .

You get a good mix of people and they are down to earth.”

References

  1. ^ Comments (0) (www.staffordshirenewsletter.co.uk)

Staffordshire County Show opens with increased security and a surge of eager visitors

Comments (0) 1

SECURITY has been tightened at this year’s Staffordshire County Show but funseekers have flocked there in their thousands to soak up an action-packed two days in the sun. The two-day rural celebration at Staffordshire County Showground, near Stafford, opened its gates today to visitors from across the country and many showed up earlier than in previous years to make the most of the good weather and the many shows within the main event. Show organisers from Staffordshire and Birmingham Agricultural Society have worked with Staffordshire Police to increase security measures in the wake of last week’s bombing in Manchester and the 100 acre showground is covered by more than 40 CCTV cameras. The national security threat was raised to critical following the attack at Manchester Arena, but lowered to severe earlier this week, and police presence was stepped up at Staffordshire tourist attractions including Trentham Gardens. Staffordshire County Showground chief executive Richard Williams said: “We have put on extra security and bag checks on arrival at the showground . We have metal detectors that are being used as well, extra foot patrols by uniformed police and sniffer dogs. “On top of that we have our own security patrols .

The police have been very supportive and I think the show is as safe as it can be.” The events of last week failed to deter families from turning up in force for the show’s first day however . The show, in its 217th year, coincides with the half term school holiday and is packed with activities for visitors of all ages, from woodland crafts and animal encounters to a traditional Punch and Judy show and thrilling stunts in the main ring from the Bolddog Lings motorcycle display team. The half term break also enabled St Joseph’s College pupil Dan Weaver, 15, from Stone, to exhibit Holstein calves at the show with friend Joel Dart, 16, also from Stone. The Weaver family, of Aston Pool Farm, have taken part in a first for the show video cattle judging . The move was introduced in some cattle classes this year to enable farmers who may be otherwise unable to attend for reasons such as staffing or TB movement restrictions to showcase their animals. In total 35 animals were videoed on their farms ahead of today’s judging and the footage was broadcast in one of the livestock rings. Dan said: “I watched a bit of the video footage and it was good to see quite a few people who have never shown here before, hopefully it will encourage them to come to the show.” Another return visitor to the County Show was John Hartley, of Leek-based business Farm to Shop, who was selling a variety of cheeses in the food hall and cookery theatre.

He said: “This is our third year here .

You get a good mix of people and they are down to earth.”

References

  1. ^ Comments (0) (www.staffordshirenewsletter.co.uk)

UK: High-security prison with 50% Muslim inmates and forced …

  • Whitemoor has highest proportion of Muslims in any British jail
  • Cambridgeshire institution has double number recorded in 2008
  • They form biggest power bloc in Category A jail, watchdogs say
  • Report says religious gulf within prison has been underestimated

By Martin Beckford, Home Affairs Editor For The Mail On Sunday

Published: 23:27, 17 October 2015 |

Legal fight: Extremist Kamel Bourgass (pictured) was held in solitary confinement at Whitemoor

Legal fight: Extremist Kamel Bourgass (pictured) was held in solitary confinement at Whitemoor.

Muslims dominate a high-security jail for the first time, sparking fear among other prisoners and staff, a report reveals.

Half of inmates at Whitemoor are now Muslims. It is believed to be the highest proportion in any British jail and double the number recorded less than a decade ago.

They form the biggest power bloc in the Category A prison, taking over from the previous gangs , according to watchdogs.

About half the prisoners on Whitemoor s main wings are Muslim, profoundly affecting the social nature of the jail and disrupting established hierarchies, the Independent Monitoring Board said.

Its report went on: Against this background we note that some prisoners and staff found the Muslim presence overwhelming. The social and religious fragmentation within Whitemoor potentially posed risks for discipline and hence safety.

It noted that some faith awareness training was being carried out but the religious gulf within the jail had been underestimated.

The report revealed half of the 447 inmates of the remote Cambridgeshire jail were Muslim in May this year up from 40 per cent a year earlier and 28 per cent in 2008.

Nationally the figure is 15 per cent.

Among Whitemoor prisoners in their 20s and 30s, 56 per cent now follow Islam.

Whitemoor in numbers: Half of the 447 inmates of the remote Cambridgeshire jail (pictured) were Muslim in May this year - up from 40 per cent a year earlier and 28 per cent in 2008.</p>
<p>Nationally the figure is 15 per cent” width=”634″ height=”403″ /></p>
<p><em>Whitemoor in numbers: Half of the 447 inmates of the remote Cambridgeshire jail (pictured) were Muslim in May this year up from 40 per cent a year earlier and 28 per cent in 2008.</p>
<p>Nationally the figure is 15 per cent. </em></p>
<p>A series of worrying reports on the establishment has revealed that inmates come under intense pressure to convert to Islam, which is treated by the most dangerous Muslims as a gang or protection racket rather than a religion.</p>
<p> There were some intimidating heavy players among the Muslim population who appeared to be orchestrating prison power dynamics rather than propagating or following the faith, according to a landmark 2012 academic study.</p>
<p>Inmates told researchers they were bullied into changing religion, and even those who resisted were too scared to cook pork in communal kitchens in case it caused offence.</p>
<p><img class=

Some prisoners claimed the jail was a recruiting ground for extremism as young inmates were in awe of convicted terrorists held there.

The social and religious fragmentation within Whitemoor potentially posed risks for discipline and hence safety
Independent Monitoring Board report

Earlier this year extremist Kamel Bourgass, serving life for murdering a policeman as he went on the run from a ricin factory, won a Supreme Court case after claiming he had been held in solitary confinement for too long at Whitemoor.

He was segregated at the jail, and eventually moved out of it, because he was feared to be involved in an escalation in violence at the prison .

However, experts say the radicalisation of criminals is less of a problem at Whitemoor than the recruitment of new members to gangs, who make money by selling dangerous legal high drugs that the authorities cannot test for.

Mark Icke, vice-president of the Prison Governors Association, said: We have a prison population which is bigger, serving longer sentences, more prone to violence, and increasingly driven by gang affiliations.

Use of legal highs, which we cannot yet test for, has destabilised the system further.