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faith

Knife attack: Do we need more security in church?

Knife Attack: Do We Need More Security In Church? Image Text:

SURGERY: Adam Brooks was attacked at NJAC in Birmingham

FOLLOWING NEWS that three men were stabbed during a church service last Sunday, people are asking if the church should be so ‘open’ and if they should provide security training to its frontline volunteers. Last Monday (September 11), a man entered New Jerusalem Apostolic Church (NJAC) in Aston, Birmingham, during its morning service and launched an unprovoked knife attack . Three members were injured in the incident Elder Karl George, Adam Brooks and Jorge George. Brooks, the son of NJAC founders Bishop Melvin and Pastor Yvonne Brooks, underwent surgery as a result of the attack . He subsequently recorded a video from his hospital bed following his operation, which was broadcast live to people that had gathered at the church on September 12 .

In it he encouraged people to level up , and do their best . At the time of writing, the video had been viewed more than 20,000 times on social media . Brooks is now recuperating at home. By their very nature, churches welcome anyone, whatever their background, so that they can attend worship services or benefit from church-run community projects. Most church volunteers who interact with the public, namely ushers and greeters, are usually untrained in security issues but perhaps it s time that this was addressed.

Knife Attack: Do We Need More Security In Church?
CRIME SCENE: NJAC in Birmingham saw a knifeman enter the building last week (image credit: Sky News)

Deaconess Madge Obaseki is co-director of growthechurchnow.com and a human resources specialist . She believes that now is a good time for churches to consider their security . She told The Voice:

Churches should get together their management committee or board of elders and trustees to formulate some form of strategy on how they can protect the public who visit their premises. She continued:

They would need to look at their frontline workers . They would need to look at their security in terms of their doorways, and preparing staff and would need some form of training in place so that staff know how to deal with people who are aggressive and show signs of mental illness.

She also said that it is imperative for churches to ensure they have employers liability insurance and public liability insurance, in order to protect volunteers, employees and the general public. Retired police officer Leroy Logan is a man with a lot of security experience . During his time at the Metropolitan Police, he was head of the Black Police Association and played a major role in managing security during the 2012 London Olympics . He currently runs his own security firm and says it is key for places of worship to undertake a risk assessment.

VULNERABLE

All churches, regardless of denomination, should carry out their own risk assessments, which should be part of the whole safeguarding issue for their fellowship and vulnerable people . If they can t do it themselves they can always tap into the local crime prevention officer.

They should be able to give a clear breakdown of the vulnerable areas in their premises and things to consider in the area.

He also advises churches to train volunteers so that they have a basic understanding of security. As head of the National Church Leaders Forum, Reverend Ade Omooba does not want churches to become over cautious because of what happened at NJAC.

We must continue to welcome people within our community with open arms but be mindful of the social pressures that they are under. As far as NJAC is concerned, it is business as usual .

They are not letting the incident stop them from serving others. In a statement they said:

There is a palpable resolve that this incident will not affect the community-focused work, the open arms and open doors policy the church has for the community and the family fellowship that exists in the church.

The Voice is celebrating its 35th birthday this year . Share your Voice memories, comments and birthday wishes on social media, using the following hash tag: #Voice35Years

Read every story in our hardcopy newspaper for free by downloading the app1.

References

  1. ^ the app (www.voice-online.co.uk)

Staffordshire County Show opens with increased security and a surge of eager visitors

Comments (0) 1

SECURITY has been tightened at this year’s Staffordshire County Show but funseekers have flocked there in their thousands to soak up an action-packed two days in the sun. The two-day rural celebration at Staffordshire County Showground, near Stafford, opened its gates today to visitors from across the country and many showed up earlier than in previous years to make the most of the good weather and the many shows within the main event. Show organisers from Staffordshire and Birmingham Agricultural Society have worked with Staffordshire Police to increase security measures in the wake of last week’s bombing in Manchester and the 100 acre showground is covered by more than 40 CCTV cameras. The national security threat was raised to critical following the attack at Manchester Arena, but lowered to severe earlier this week, and police presence was stepped up at Staffordshire tourist attractions including Trentham Gardens. Staffordshire County Showground chief executive Richard Williams said: “We have put on extra security and bag checks on arrival at the showground . We have metal detectors that are being used as well, extra foot patrols by uniformed police and sniffer dogs. “On top of that we have our own security patrols .

The police have been very supportive and I think the show is as safe as it can be.” The events of last week failed to deter families from turning up in force for the show’s first day however . The show, in its 217th year, coincides with the half term school holiday and is packed with activities for visitors of all ages, from woodland crafts and animal encounters to a traditional Punch and Judy show and thrilling stunts in the main ring from the Bolddog Lings motorcycle display team. The half term break also enabled St Joseph’s College pupil Dan Weaver, 15, from Stone, to exhibit Holstein calves at the show with friend Joel Dart, 16, also from Stone. The Weaver family, of Aston Pool Farm, have taken part in a first for the show video cattle judging . The move was introduced in some cattle classes this year to enable farmers who may be otherwise unable to attend for reasons such as staffing or TB movement restrictions to showcase their animals. In total 35 animals were videoed on their farms ahead of today’s judging and the footage was broadcast in one of the livestock rings. Dan said: “I watched a bit of the video footage and it was good to see quite a few people who have never shown here before, hopefully it will encourage them to come to the show.” Another return visitor to the County Show was John Hartley, of Leek-based business Farm to Shop, who was selling a variety of cheeses in the food hall and cookery theatre.

He said: “This is our third year here .

You get a good mix of people and they are down to earth.”

References

  1. ^ Comments (0) (www.staffordshirenewsletter.co.uk)

Staffordshire County Show opens with increased security and a …

Comments (0) 1

SECURITY has been tightened at this year’s Staffordshire County Show but funseekers have flocked there in their thousands to soak up an action-packed two days in the sun. The two-day rural celebration at Staffordshire County Showground, near Stafford, opened its gates today to visitors from across the country and many showed up earlier than in previous years to make the most of the good weather and the many shows within the main event. Show organisers from Staffordshire and Birmingham Agricultural Society have worked with Staffordshire Police to increase security measures in the wake of last week’s bombing in Manchester and the 100 acre showground is covered by more than 40 CCTV cameras. The national security threat was raised to critical following the attack at Manchester Arena, but lowered to severe earlier this week, and police presence was stepped up at Staffordshire tourist attractions including Trentham Gardens. Staffordshire County Showground chief executive Richard Williams said: “We have put on extra security and bag checks on arrival at the showground . We have metal detectors that are being used as well, extra foot patrols by uniformed police and sniffer dogs. “On top of that we have our own security patrols .

The police have been very supportive and I think the show is as safe as it can be.” The events of last week failed to deter families from turning up in force for the show’s first day however . The show, in its 217th year, coincides with the half term school holiday and is packed with activities for visitors of all ages, from woodland crafts and animal encounters to a traditional Punch and Judy show and thrilling stunts in the main ring from the Bolddog Lings motorcycle display team. The half term break also enabled St Joseph’s College pupil Dan Weaver, 15, from Stone, to exhibit Holstein calves at the show with friend Joel Dart, 16, also from Stone. The Weaver family, of Aston Pool Farm, have taken part in a first for the show video cattle judging . The move was introduced in some cattle classes this year to enable farmers who may be otherwise unable to attend for reasons such as staffing or TB movement restrictions to showcase their animals. In total 35 animals were videoed on their farms ahead of today’s judging and the footage was broadcast in one of the livestock rings. Dan said: “I watched a bit of the video footage and it was good to see quite a few people who have never shown here before, hopefully it will encourage them to come to the show.” Another return visitor to the County Show was John Hartley, of Leek-based business Farm to Shop, who was selling a variety of cheeses in the food hall and cookery theatre.

He said: “This is our third year here .

You get a good mix of people and they are down to earth.”

References

  1. ^ Comments (0) (www.staffordshirenewsletter.co.uk)