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Grizz the airport security dog shot after escape

An airport security dog has been shot dead by police in New Zealand after it escaped from its handler, causing flight delays. Grizz, a trainee explosives detector dog, was being loaded into a van by his handler in the public area at Auckland Airport at around 4.30am on Friday local time. It is not clear what spooked the 10-month-old bearded collie/German short haired pointer cross but he ran off and managed to get into the airport’s secure area when a gate opened to let a truck through. Aviation Security Service (Avsec) spokesman Mike Richards told Sky News that off duty dog handlers were called in to help search for Grizz.

“The fact that the incident took place very early in the morning did not help as it was pitch black for the first two hours and he could not be found,” he said. Grizz had been six months away from graduating but he did not have a permanent handler, which meant he was “less responsive” to those searching for him. Mr Richards added: “When he was located he would not let anyone near him and kept sprinting across the runways.

“We tried everything – food, toys, other dogs, but nothing would work. “The area is too vast and too open to try and use mobile fencing.” Meanwhile, 16 flights were delayed. Auckland Airport decided to have police shoot Grizz, according to Inspector Tracy Phillips of Counties and Manukau District Police.

She added: “This is not an outcome which anyone wanted, and police were only asked to be involved as a last resort.” Airport spokeswoman Lisa Mulitalo told the New Zealand Herald: “The dog was clearly distressed and wouldn’t let anyone near it so the decision was made to shoot the dog.” Mr Richards said that Grizz’s handler at the time and his colleagues were “naturally quite shaken but understand the reasons for the decision”.

Each dog like Grizz costs $100,000 ( 56,500) to train, he added. Among those who criticised the decision to shoot Grizz was popular TVNZ breakfast show host Hilary Barry, who said: “They’ve got to have tranquiliser guns, surely. “They shot the dog dead.

“I don’t care if your plane is delayed, they don’t need to shoot the dog.”

New Zealand news websites also ran polls which showed that the majority of those voting thought Grizz should not have been killed.

NC General Assembly police are looking at ways to enhance security

Visitors to the Legislative Building in recent days may have noticed something they haven’t seen before a uniformed police officer posted at the rear entrance to the building. The change is part of an overall security review of the legislative complex, according to police. Chief Martin Brock of the N.C .

General Assembly Police Department said officers are counting the number of people who use each entrance of the building . He described the review as part of an “ongoing conversation” about safety concerns. “We’re just looking at possible ways to enhance security in the complex, so we want to get an idea of how many people are coming and going,” he said. Brock, who took over as chief last spring with the retirement of former chief Jeff Weaver, said he expects officers to collect data for about a month. “It’s preliminary, a project that I instructed the officers to do so that we could look at ways to help make the place more safe,” Brock said. “Right now we’re just looking at the lobby entrances on this building . We may look at the other areas — the (Legislative Office Building), the basement, the parking decks on legislative property at a later time.” Building security has been routinely under review since at least the mid-1990s, said one senator who has pressed for greater security measures . Sen . Andrew Brock, a Davie County Republican, worked on the Senate’s sergeant-at-arms staff from 1995 to 1996 . He said that security reviews of the legislative complex were conducted by federal agencies in the wake of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, an act of domestic terrorism against a federal building that killed 168 people. “No one ever settles on security,” Sen .

Brock, no relation to the police chief, said. “It’s ever-changing so you’re always doing reviews year in and year out to see if best practices are in place and looking at incoming threats.” After Republicans took control of the General Assembly in 2011, Sen . Brock was behind a plan to install metal detectors at the Legislative Building and to require most visitors to enter through the main front entrance .

Those plans stalled because they were too expensive, he said. Sen . Brock said security at public buildings also has a political aspect. “That’s part of it, the perception of people coming in,” he said. “We like the openness of people being able to come in, but that’s also a hindrance .

You have liberty versus security as an issue.”

After bombs, Pakistan tightens security for rare major cricket match

By Mubasher Bukhari1 | LAHORE, Pakistan

LAHORE, Pakistan Pakistan tightened security in the city of Lahore ahead of a hugely anticipated final of its domestic cricket league on Sunday, pushing ahead with a rare high-profile match despite a recent spike in Islamist violence.

The government had wavered momentarily on whether to host the Pakistan Super League (PSL) final after a series of militant attacks killed more than 130 people last month, including a suicide bombing in Lahore in which at least 13 people died.

Pakistan has only hosted one international series since militants attacked a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore in 2009 . Six players were hurt while two civilians and six security officials were killed in that attack.

A tour by Zimbabwe’s cricket team in 2015 was almost disrupted when a suicide bomber killed two security officials near a stadium.

While the Pakistan Super League is in its second year and boasts a television viewership in excess of 50 million people, all matches have been played in the United Arab Emirates.

Rana Sanaullah, law minister for Punjab province, of which Lahore is capital, told Reuters the government had “prepared a fool-proof security plan” for the night-time game, expected to finish after midnight (1900 GMT).

Sanaullah said nearly 4,000 police and paramilitary Rangers would be patrolling the area and fans would have to pass five security layers before reaching the 25,000-capacity stadium where the Peshawar Zalmi will be playing Quetta Gladiators.

But not everyone has been convinced.

Citing security fears, some high-profile foreign players such as former England captain Kevin Pietersen, who plays for the Quetta team, decided to skip the final.

West Indian World Cup winner Darren Sammy, who plays for Peshawar, will be on the field.

On the morning of the match, cricket-obsessed Pakistanis were brushing off security worries and relishing the chance to once again savour big-game cricket on home soil.

“For the last several weeks, we were not going to restaurants because of threats of terrorism . But celebration of the PSL final has brought us out,” said school teacher Maleeha Rizvi, 48, dining with her family near the stadium.

“I guess this event has defeated terrorism,” she added.

Pakistan has been desperate for international cricket events to return but some media commentators have accused officials of risking lives by staging an event during a period of heightened security threats.

Officials, however, say security in Pakistan has greatly improved over the past few years and the recent bout of violence was a temporary blip.

(Writing by Saad Sayeed; Editing by Drazen Jorgic, Robert Birsel)


References

  1. ^ Mubasher Bukhari (uk.reuters.com)