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Partial amnesty over Northern Ireland for security forces ‘hard to administer’

  • Partial amnesty over Northern Ireland for security forces ‘hard to administer’

    BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

    A partial amnesty for police and soldiers’ actions during the Northern Ireland conflict would be difficult to administer, the country’s top prosecutor said. https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/partial-amnesty-over-northern-ireland-for-security-forces-hard-to-administer-36369190.html

    https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/article36369189.ece/5e3d4/AUTOCROP/h342/PANews%20BT_P-fcb8020f-c0e6-4f55-b560-99aafbd7d900_I1.jpg

  • Email1

A partial amnesty for police and soldiers’ actions during the Northern Ireland conflict would be difficult to administer, the country’s top prosecutor said. Sinn Fein and the Irish government have objected after some MPs called for a “statute of limitations” law . Proposals on addressing the legacy of deaths and injuries during Northern Ireland’s 30 years of violence have not yet been published.

Departing Director of Public Prosecutions Barra McGrory QC said a partial safeguard from prosecution favouring the security forces would be legally questionable. He said: “As DPP, a partial amnesty would be difficult to administer . I t would certainly invite challenges but it is not for me to say whether it is legal or not.

“If it is a statute, it is a statute so it will have gone through parliament.

“In terms of the international legality of it, it would be questionable.”

MPs from the House of Commons Defence Committee have called for the blocking of prosecutions. Veterans have argued that it was unfair to charge pensioners over crimes committed early in the conflict.

The UK Government has said its preferred option for addressing the past is the 2014 Stormont House Agreement between the local parties, which did not include the proposal envisaged by some Conservative MPs. Their opinions are well-known, including within Government. Stormont House included a range of measures to address the past, including an Historical Investigations Unit (HIU) to search for new opportunities to prosecute.

It also envisaged a Commission on Information Retrieval whereby relatives of the dead and injured could privately receive information about the deaths of their loved ones . Its information would be inadmissible for criminal legal proceedings. Mr McGrory said around a quarter of his total workload was taken up with dealing with legacy issues.

He added: “The last 18 months the legal landscape from a prosecutorial perspective has become increasingly dominated by legacy, it is taking up a significant amount of time.”

He said as part of any implementation of the Stormont House Agreement resources would be made available to his successor to deal with the flow of cases referred by HIU investigators.

“That will very significantly increase the workload on the PPS as far as legacy is concerned.

“It would be utterly unsustainable under the current resource pot.

“I would expect that of the pot of money set aside to implement the Stormont House Agreement a significant amount of it would come our way but it will still nevertheless be a significant burden on the prosecutor’s office.”

References

  1. ^ Email (www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk)

Uber bins security chief over $100000 hack cover-up

Uber has got rid of its chief security officer and announced that his team paid off hackers who stole data belonging to 57 million users. The ride-hailing app’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said: “None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it.” Former CSO, Joe Sullivan, presided over a loss of the names, email addresses and mobile phone numbers belonging to Uber drivers and passengers, according to Bloomberg. Mr Sullivan’s team then paid the hackers $100,000 to delete the data instead of notifying the victims. Uber’s former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, learned of the hack in 2016, according to Bloomberg – seven months before a shareholder revolt forced him to quit1 and replaced him with Mr Khosrowshahi. “At the time of the incident, we took immediate steps to secure the data and shut down further unauthorised access by the individuals,” said Mr Khosrowshahi. Uber says it does not believe its customers need to take any action.

Image: ‘None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it,’ said Uber’s CEO

“We have seen no evidence of fraud or misuse tied to the incident,” says a help page on its site.

“We are monitoring the affected accounts and have flagged them for additional fraud protection.” Mr Khosrowshahi said the data had been stolen from a “third-party cloud-based service” – understood to be Amazon Web Services, which the attackers accessed using legitimate passwords stolen via coding website Github. “We subsequently identified the individuals and obtained assurances that the downloaded data had been destroyed”.

The chief executive, who joined the company in August, added in his statement: “You may be asking why we are just talking about this now, a year later. “I had the same question, so I immediately asked for a thorough investigation of what happened and how we handled it. “While I can’t erase the past, I can commit on behalf of every Uber employee that we will learn from our mistakes.”

Image: Details of the hack come as Uber fights against the loss of its London licence

The data breach comes as Uber looks to improve its image after bad publicity during the tenure of Uber’s founder Travis Kalanick, and the decision by transport bosses in London to take away its licence. Mr Kalanick was ousted as chief executive in June after an internal investigation concluded he had built a culture that allowed female workers to be sexually harassed and encouraged employees to push legal limits. Uber’s new boss said the company was now working with regulators on the breach and notifying drivers whose licence numbers were downloaded – as well as giving them credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

A review of its security is also taking place in conjunction with Matt Olsen, a former National Security Agency general counsel and cybersecurity expert.

References

  1. ^ a shareholder revolt forced him to quit (news.sky.com)

Uber ‘paid off’ hackers who stole data from 57 million people

Uber has got rid of its chief security officer and announced that his team paid off hackers who stole data belonging to 57 million users. The ride-hailing app’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said: “None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it.” Former CSO, Joe Sullivan, presided over a loss of the names, email addresses and mobile phone numbers belonging to Uber drivers and passengers, according to Bloomberg. Mr Sullivan’s team then paid the hackers $100,000 to delete the data instead of notifying the victims. Uber’s former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, learned of the hack in 2016, according to Bloomberg – seven months before a shareholder revolt forced him to quit1 and replaced him with Mr Khosrowshahi. “At the time of the incident, we took immediate steps to secure the data and shut down further unauthorised access by the individuals,” said Mr Khosrowshahi. Uber says it does not believe its customers need to take any action.

Image: ‘None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it,’ said Uber’s CEO

“We have seen no evidence of fraud or misuse tied to the incident,” says a help page on its site.

“We are monitoring the affected accounts and have flagged them for additional fraud protection.” Mr Khosrowshahi said the data had been stolen from a “third-party cloud-based service” – understood to be Amazon Web Services, which the attackers accessed using legitimate passwords stolen via coding website Github. “We subsequently identified the individuals and obtained assurances that the downloaded data had been destroyed”.

The chief executive, who joined the company in August, added in his statement: “You may be asking why we are just talking about this now, a year later. “I had the same question, so I immediately asked for a thorough investigation of what happened and how we handled it. “While I can’t erase the past, I can commit on behalf of every Uber employee that we will learn from our mistakes.”

The data breach comes as Uber looks to improve its image after bad publicity during the tenure of Uber’s founder Travis Kalanick, and the decision by transport bosses in London to take away its licence. Mr Kalanick was ousted as chief executive in June after an internal investigation concluded he had built a culture that allowed female workers to be sexually harassed and encouraged employees to push legal limits. Uber’s new boss said the company was now working with regulators on the breach and notifying drivers whose licence numbers were downloaded – as well as giving them credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

A review of its security is also taking place in conjunction with Matt Olsen, a former National Security Agency general counsel and cybersecurity expert.

References

  1. ^ a shareholder revolt forced him to quit (news.sky.com)