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Swedish intelligence agency says there is ‘real and serious security …

  • 1/35 13 March 2017

    US President Donald J . Trump holds up a note and drawing depicting him that was created by the child of Greg Knox of Ohio, during a meeting on healthcare in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC

    EPA

  • 2/35 13 March 2017

    Relatives hold up placards with pictures of victims as they gather in commemoration on the first anniversary of the March 13 terror attack at the former site of the bombing in central Ankara

    Getty Images

  • 3/35 13 March 2017

    Aaron Hernandez confers with his defence attorney Jose Baez, during his double murder trial in Boston

    AP

  • 4/35 12 March 2017

    People celebrate Holi festival at a temple in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Rex

  • 5/35 12 March 2017

    A Sadhu or Hindu holy man with his face smeared with powdered colours looks on during Holi festival celebrations at Sri Laxmi Narayan Temple in Amritsar, India

    EPA

  • 6/35 5 March 2017

    A member of the Tinstix of Dynamite aerobatics team flies in front of a wall of fire during the Australian International Airshow in Melbourne

    Getty Images

  • 7/35 5 March 2017

    A participant stretches on the beach before the start of an annual two-mile sea swimming competition in Colombo, Sri Lanka

    Reuters

  • 8/35 5 March 2017

    Participants jump into water during the annual two-mile sea swimming competition in Colombo, Sri Lanka

    Reuters

  • 9/35 5 March 2017

    Japan’s Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko wave to bid farewell as they depart for Thailand from Phu Bai International Airport in the central city of Hue, Vietnam

    EPA

  • 10/35 5 March 2017

    Reconnaissance unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) on display indoors at the International Defence Exhibition in Iraq (IQDEX) 2017

    Getty Images

  • 11/35 5 March 2017

    A participant presents hisr vintage vehicle during the 59th International Vintage Car Rally Barcelona-Sitges, at plaza Sant Jaume in Barcelona, Spain . Some 50 vintage vehicles take part in the two-day long event, through the coastal line of Mediterranean Sea from Barcelona to Sitges

    EPA

  • 12/35 5 March 2017

    Participants present their vintage cars during the 59th International Vintage Car Rally Barcelona-Sitges, at plaza Sant Jaume in Barcelona, Spain

    EPA

  • 13/35 5 March 2017

    New York Governor Mario Cuomo looks around the ‘Hall of Names’ in the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem .

    The hall has portraits of some 600 individuals exterminated by the Nazis during the Holocaust of World War II

    EPA

  • 14/35 5 March 2017

    The Chinese police officers on self balancing police vehicles patrol in Tiananmen Square before the opening of the fifth Session of the 12th National People’s Congress (NPC) outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China

    EPA

  • 15/35 5 March 2017

    A general view shows the opening session of the National People’s Congress, China’s legislature, in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People

    Getty Images

  • 16/35 5 March 2017

    Hostesses jump as they pose for a picture during the opening of the National People’s Congress in Beijing

    Getty Images

  • 17/35 5 March 2017

    A picture taken in the Iraqi capital Bahgdad shows rocket launchers on display indoors at the International Defence Exhibition in Iraq (IQDEX) 2017

    Getty Images

  • 18/35 5 March 2017

    A Pakistani army helicopter flies past floodlights as it patrols over The Gaddafi Cricket Stadium in Lahore, ahead of the final cricket match of the Pakistan Super League (PSL) between Quetta Gladiators and Peshawar Zalmi

    Getty Images

  • 19/35 5 March 2017

    A Buddhist devotee dashes barefoot through flames during the Nagatoro Hi-Matsuri, or fire walking festival, to herald the coming of spring, at the Fudoji temple in Nagatoro town, Saitama prefecture

    Getty Images

  • 20/35 5 March 2017

    A resident inspects their personal house belongings after a moderate earthquake hit the Surigao city, southern Philippines

    Reuters

  • 21/35 5 March 2017

    People with portraits of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin gather outside his museum in his native town of Gori, some 80 kms outside Tbilisi, on the 64th anniversary of Stalin’s death . While historians blame Stalin for the deaths of millions in purges, prison camps and forced collectivization, many in Russia still praise him for leading the Soviet Union to victory over Nazi Germany in World War I

    Getty Images

  • 22/35 5 March 2017

    Head of Ukraine’s tax and customs service Roman Nasirov, who is under investigation over the suspected embezzlement and who according to several unconfirmed local media reports recently suffered a heart attack, lies inside the defendant’s cage during a court hearing in Kiev, Ukraine

    Reuters

  • 23/35 4 March 2017

    Flag bearer Jesslyn Swirka rides her horse down Harrison Avenue in Leadville, Colorado at the start of the 68th annual Leadville Ski Joring weekend competition in Leadville, Colorado . Skijoring, which has its origins as a competitive sport in Scandinavia, has been adapted over the years to include a team made up of a rider and skier who must navigate jumps, slalom gates, and the spearing of rings for points .

    Leadville, with an elevation of 10,152 feet (3,094 m), the highest incorporated city in North America, has been hosting skijoring competitions since 1949

    Getty Images

  • 24/35 4 March 2017

    A rider races down Harrison Avenue while a skier navigates the course during the 68th annual Leadville Ski Joring weekend competition in Leadville, Colorado

    Getty Images

  • 25/35 4 March 2017

    A demonstrator in opposition of US President Donald Trump sets a hat on fire during a ‘People 4 Trump’ rally in Berkeley, California

    Reuters

  • 26/35 4 March 2017

    A demonstrator in support of US President Donald Trump swings a stick towards a group of counter-protesters during a ‘People 4 Trump’ rally in Berkeley, California

    Reuters

  • 27/35 4 March 2017

    A bloodied supporter of US President Donald Trump is seen after a ‘People 4 Trump’ rally and counter-protest turned violent in Berkeley, California

    Reuters

  • 28/35 4 March 2017

    Women take part in a performance to protest against the disappearance of the 43 students of Ayotzinapa College Raul Isidro Burgos in Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico

    Reuters

  • 29/35 4 March 2017

    A woman looks on as she takes part in a performance to protest against the disappearance of the 43 students of Ayotzinapa College Raul Isidro Burgos in Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico

    Reuters

  • 30/35 4 March 2017

    An Iraqi special forces soldier fires at a drone operated by Islamic State militants Islamic State militants in Mosul, Iraq

    Reuters

  • 31/35 4 March 2017

    A man cries while carrying his daughter as he walks from Islamic State controlled part of Mosul towards Iraqi special forces soldiers during a battle in Mosul, Iraq

    Reuters

  • 32/35 4 March 2017

    Iraqi special forces soldiers walk in a street in Mosul, Iraq

    Reuters

  • 33/35 4 March 2017

    An Iraqi special forces soldier helps a family carry their child to cross from Islamic State controlled part of Mosul to Iraqi forces controlled part of Mosul, Iraq

    Reuters

  • 34/35 4 March 2017

    A man looks towards a Russian helicopter as it flies over ruins in the historic city of Palmyra, Syria

    Reuters

  • 35/35 2 March 2017

    Policemen and a passerby look at pictures of the ones killed due to alleged involvement in illegal drugs, during a protest against extra-judicial killings at an open area of a Roman Catholic Church in Paranaque city, metro Manila, Philippines

    Reuters

  • Security beefed up to keep travellers out

    A 174,000 pot of cash will be spent over the next two years to beef up security at sites where travellers have been illegally setting up camps. Taxpayers money has been set aside as it has been revealed that the number of such camps has been steadily rising over the past few years on council-owned land across the county.

    In 2013 there were 92 illegal camps with 507 caravans, rising to 116 with 760 caravans in 2014, 139 with 815 caravans in 2015, and 136 with 884 caravans last year. The figures do not include camps on privately-owned land.

    The hardest hit, according to the figures, has been Warwick district, and its council s cabinet is expected to approve the money to install preventative measures at 37 sites over the next two years at a meeting on Wednesday, 8th March. The sites include the Hatton Park estate, St Mary s Lands and St Nicholas Park car park. The latter two have had several camps set up on them since just before Christmas . Measures at all of the sites include new gates, height restriction barriers, bollards and even the planting of new trees to keep travellers out.

    A report set to go before to the cabinet on Wednesday says: Officers have identified a number of council-owned locations that are vulnerable to unauthorised encampments and have estimated the costs. But it adds: One of the underlying issues is that the council has not been successful in is locating suitable land for transit sites for many years . Indeed Warwick district is the only local authority area in the county not to have any such site.

    Whilst it is not possible to prove a cause and effect between that fact and the high number of unauthorised encampments the district is experiencing, it is clear that the lack of available transit or emergency stopping sites does prohibit the use of some powers that the police possess and clearly if that changed then there would be an additional string to the bow of the police and the council. There are four traveller sites across Warwickshire, three are run by the county council, including the site at Pathlow near Stratford, and one is run by Rugby Borough Council .

    That one has recently had a 900,000 revamp, and between them they have around 90 pitches. There are also several privately-run sites across the county, and the county council is in the process of establishing two so-called transit sites one in the north of the county and one in the south, in Southam, which falls into Stratford District. Better communication between police, councils and other agencies over illegal traveller camps will be at the centre of a new strategy that is also being drawn following a meeting of them that was organised by the county s police and crime commissioner, Philip Seccombe.

    Former Approved Contractor prosecuted for supplying unlicensed guards over 170 times

    Former Approved Contractor Prosecuted For Supplying Unlicensed Guards Over 170 Times

    On Thursday 16 February, at Basingstoke Magistrates Court, Steven Douglas of Triforce Security Solutions Ltd, was found guilty of supplying unlicensed security operatives. Triforce Security Solutions Ltd are members of our Approved Contractors Scheme (ACS), which exists to raise performance standards in the private security industry. The investigation into the company began after we received information that they had supplied unlicensed security operatives to work on some of their contracts for security services.

    Douglas refuted the allegations, which had been put to him by the SIA, and provided a list of the employees that Triforce had supplied. However this list contained the details of two security operatives whose licences had expired. Douglas also assured our investigators that neither of these operatives had been supplied to any contract after their licence had expired. This appeared to be confirmed by time sheets emailed to us by Triforce Security Solutions. During the investigation, the customer requested that the timesheets be cross checked.

    Our investigators compared the time sheets and discovered that the guards whose licences had expired appeared on the documents sent to the SIA from the customer, but not those supplied by Triforce Security Solutions Ltd. Our investigators then interviewed the security guards in question, who admitted to working without a licence for a considerable time. They also disclosed that Douglas was aware the guards were unlicensed as they themselves had informed him. Following this, we interviewed Douglas under caution and in a statement admitted that he had constructed false records. He also stated that he had supplied these documents to the SIA in an attempt to cover up this fact.

    In one instance a security guard was supplied on 110 occasions. In another case, a security guard was supplied on 62 occasions. Douglas took full responsibility, absolving both his fellow director and his business and marketing manager who both stated that they had no knowledge of his actions. He pleaded guilty to a section 5 offence (via section 22) under the Private Security Industry Act (PSIA) 2001, for supplying unlicensed guards. He was fined 425, ordered to pay costs in the sum of 3,293.30 and given a victim surcharge of 43.

    The company, Triforce Security Solutions Ltd, also pleaded guilty to a section 5 PSIA (2001) offence. They were fined 1000 ordered to pay costs of 3,293 and given a victim surcharge of 100. In total, Douglas and Triforce Security Solutions Ltd have to pay 8,154. The ACS status of the company will also be reviewed.

    Our Investigations Manager, Pete Easterbrook, said:

    “This outcome highlights that where we identify criminal offences being committed within the security industry, the SIA has the will and capability to ensure that those responsible are prosecuted and face the consequences of their actions.

    In addition to any punishment imposed by the court, likely consequences can include the revocation of SIA licences from individuals, and the removal of Approved Contractor Scheme status from businesses.

    This particular offence was aggravated by the regulator being provided with false information and documents, something which will not be tolerated, and is very likely to see those responsible end up with a criminal conviction, as was the case here”.

    Further information:

    • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
    • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

      The SIA is also on FacebookFormer Approved Contractor Prosecuted For Supplying Unlicensed Guards Over 170 Times (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterFormer Approved Contractor Prosecuted For Supplying Unlicensed Guards Over 170 Times (SIAuk).