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door supervision

SIA responds to coverage on Benchmarking Security and Stewarding Resourcing

SIA Responds To Coverage On Benchmarking Security And Stewarding Resourcing

The SIA welcomes the spotlight being shone on the continuing need for recruitment and retention of good quality staff in the events sector. The report raises some health challenges about how adequately the current market is supplying qualified and vetted security operatives and the problems that losing skilled staff represents to the industry.
A figure of 40% reduction in renewals of SIA licences has been cited in the reporting of the study. It is worth setting this in context:

  • This figure has been derived from some possible projections that the SIA had commissioned in early 2016.
  • The data quoted from the projections are only about SIA Door Supervision licences (the most relevant licence to the events sector) and not the whole regulated security industry.
  • The projection represents the worst-case-future-scenario based on certain modelling techniques and is not intended as an accurate picture of the current position in the industry.

The Benchmarking Security and Stewarding Resourcing study correctly highlights that a significant proportion of people do not renew their three year SIA licence. Each year these exiting licence holders are usually replaced by new applicants for SIA licences, so that the overall number of licence holders does vary to a degree, but not as significantly as suggested by some recent reporting. Our records show that the actual number of people holding door supervision licences has fallen between 2013 and 2017 by about 10%.

The data should not be interpreted as a 40% reduction in the number of SIA licence holders who decide to renew their licences but this does not mean that the industry are not currently facing significant difficulties in the recruitment and retention of quality staff
Notes:

  1. The SIA licences certain sectors within the private security industry.

    Door Supervisors are required for security work in relation to licensed premises and events.

  2. SIA licences (except vehicle immobilisation in Northern Ireland) last for a period of three years.
  3. For your further information, we show below the number of SIA Door Supervision licence holders at the 31st March since 2011.
  4. The London 2012 Games had some impact on licence application numbers.
  5. The table below shows the number of door supervision licence holders in each year from 2011 – 2017

SIA Door Supervision Licence Holders 2011-2017 Year (31st March) Licence Holders 2011203,854 2012208,680 2013224,619 2014221,288 2015219,590 2016200,523 2017201,821

You can download the report Benchmarking Security and Stewarding Resourcing here. Further information:

  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

    The SIA is also on FacebookSIA Responds To Coverage On Benchmarking Security And Stewarding Resourcing (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterSIA Responds To Coverage On Benchmarking Security And Stewarding Resourcing (SIAuk).

Door Supervisor prosecuted for attempted fraud, by falsely claiming compensation from the SIA

Door Supervisor Prosecuted For Attempted Fraud, By Falsely Claiming Compensation From The SIA

On 11 August 2017, at Bristol Magistrates Court, we prosecuted Zakir Mohammed Zillul for attempting to claim 1673 in compensation for alleged lost travel documents. In August 2016, Zillul submitted an application to the SIA for a Door Supervision Licence. In support of this application, and to verify his identity, he sent his passport to us. On Friday 16 September 2016, Zillul contacted us say that he was due to travel abroad on 21 September and needed his passport to be returned as soon as possible. We returned Zillul s passport via Royal Mail Special Delivery on 20 September to arrive by 1 pm the next day.

However, due to a delay by Royal Mail, the passport was not delivered on 21 September. Zillul claimed that as a result of the late return of his passport he could not travel as he had arranged. On 26 September 2016, Zillul contacted us to make a claim for 1673, which was the cost of his apparent flights. We agreed to consider a compensation or reimbursement claim if Zillul could produce evidence of the missed flights, including proof of payment. This would be reviewed alongside the circumstances of the return of Zillul s passport.

In October 2016, following a successful application, Zillul was issued with a Door Supervisor licence. Zillul emailed us in October 2016 with evidence of the cost of the travel, and a document purporting to be an itinerary/invoice from a travel agent showing the alleged cost of the flights. In addition, he provided evidence to us, showing cash withdrawals from his bank account which he claimed were made to pay for the holiday. We believed that the documentation provided was false, so an investigation was carried out by their Criminal Investigation Team. They discovered that Zillul had not made any such travel booking.

Instead he had asked a travel agent to produce an invoice and itinerary. He used the excuse that he needed to make a claim from his travel insurance company, but had lost the relevant paperwork. When interviewed, Zillul said that a cousin was responsible for making the claim for compensation in his name. He claimed that this cousin had access and online control of Zillul s bank account and email, and implied that his cousin was corresponding to us in his name. Zillul added that his cousin was involved in a relationship with the travel agent who had provided the alleged invoice.

The travel agent denied this, and stated that she did not know the person named as Zillul s cousin. She did, however, admit to knowing Zillul, and to falsely producing an invoice itinerary for what she thought was a claim against Zillul s travel insurance. The travel agent confirmed that no actual travel booking was made by Zillul. Despite numerous attempts made by our investigators to identify Zillul s cousin, he was not traced, nor did he make himself available for interview. Zillul pleaded guilty to attempted fraud by false representation, and to having in his possession an article for use in fraud (the email purporting to be from the travel agent to support his claim for compensation).

The Court sentenced Zillul to 210 hours of unpaid community service, to be completed within a 12 months. Zillul was also ordered to pay 2046.30 prosecution costs and an 85 victim surcharge. Nathan Salmon, SIA Criminal Investigation Manager, said;

Zillul fraudulently tried to obtain compensation of 1673.00 from the SIA, when he clearly had no right to do so, He devised an elaborate plan involving the production and presentation of false documentary evidence to support his claim, using the misguided assistance of another person to facilitate the crime. The SIA robustly regulates the security industry and will seek to prosecute those individuals who choose to commit criminal offences – either in their individual licence application, or when they are working as a licensed security operative .

Further information:

  • *The details of the role that Limited Risk played in relation to Quinton were pursued by the Insolvency Service.
  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

    The SIA is also on FacebookDoor Supervisor Prosecuted For Attempted Fraud, By Falsely Claiming Compensation From The SIA (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterDoor Supervisor Prosecuted For Attempted Fraud, By Falsely Claiming Compensation From The SIA (SIAuk).

Unlicensed door supervisor fined for using a forged SIA licence

Unlicensed Door Supervisor Fined For Using A Forged SIA Licence

In August 2016 our investigator inspected security staff at a taxi company in Chester. This individual was operating as a taxi marshal, working to make sure that the taxi queue did not get out of hand. After inspecting further our investigators observed that the SIA licence displayed on the security operative s arm was different to the name his colleagues called him. They checked the Register for Licence Holders (ROLH) and found out that the licence the security operative was wearing had expired in 2014. The expiry date on the licence card he was wearing also appeared to be altered, so the investigators made a formal request for the SIA licence to be returned.

Further questioning revealed that this security operative was in fact Stacey Sam Harrison, a family member of the original licence holder. The date of birth and address Stacey had originally provided were his own. Checks revealed that Stacey Harrison had never held an SIA licence. After being interviewed under caution in January 2017, Stacey Harrison admitted taking the expired licence. He said he found the licence at a family member s house and made amendments to it. These amendments were to the expiry date and sector. He adjusted the sector as he wanted employers to think he had a door supervision licence, as his employers were seeking door supervision contracts.

During the interview, it became clear that the activity he was employed for was licensable. He also told investigators that he worked at another taxi company regularly and, on occasion, at the Racecourse in Chester for the same employer. Following the initial inspection, in August 2016, the directors of the company were interviewed by our SIA investigators. This interview revealed that Stacey Harrison had been working for the company, unlicensed, from 2011 to August 2016. Our investigators also discovered that the directors knew Harrison under a different name, and that Harrison had led them to believe he was licensed at all times.

One of the directors produced a copy of the licence Harrison had supplied to them, which appeared to have been subject to similar alterations to that handed to our SIA investigation officers. Harrison pleaded guilty to working without a licence. He claimed that he did not have a job at the time, and couldn’t afford the 500 required to obtain a licence. He apologised to the Court for committing these offences. The judge commented that licences exist for a reason and that the offences committed by Harrison were serious, especially forgery of a licence.

Harrison was fined 360, reduced to 240 due to his early guilty plea. He was also ordered to pay 250 in costs, and a victim surcharge of 30. Criminal Investigations Manager, Pete Easterbrook commented that

Working as a security operative without an SIA licence is a serious offence. However, Stacey Harrison took this one step further and altered the SIA licence of a family member and attempted to pass this off as genuine. This is fraud and will not be tolerated by the SIA or the security industry, especially those frontline operatives who have worked hard to genuinely obtain their SIA licence.

The conviction of Mr. Harrison for these offences serves as a reminder that those who seek to undermine the law in this way are very likely to be found out and will face the consequences of their actions in court.

Further information:

  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

    The SIA is also on FacebookUnlicensed Door Supervisor Fined For Using A Forged SIA Licence (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterUnlicensed Door Supervisor Fined For Using A Forged SIA Licence (SIAuk).