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Barred security director to be sentenced at crown court and accomplice sentenced

On 12 October 2017, at Caernarfon Magistrates Court, Mark Pursglove was referred to the crown court to be sentenced for working without an SIA licence. Rachel Williams was sentenced for aiding and abetting offences. This sentencing follows the prosecution of Mark Pursglove and Rachel Williams on 14 September 2017. Mark Pursglove was prosecuted in 2016 because he had supplied unlicensed security operatives. Once his company was found guilty, Mark Pursglove continued to act as a director despite being unlicensed and positioned Rachel Williams as the frontwoman of the business to conceal this fact.

Our investigators inspected this further and based on intelligence built a case against Mark Pursglove and Rachel Williams. In this previous hearing, they were then found guilty at Llandudno Magistrates Court on 14 September. In the latest hearing, we made an application for the sentencing of Mark Pursglove to be committed to the Crown Court in order to pursue the confiscation of assets under the Proceeds of Crime Act (2002). As a result, the sentencing of Pursglove has been adjourned till November at Caernarfon Crown Court. Rachel Williams was sentenced and received a community order of 150 hours of unpaid work, to be completed within the next 12 months.

She was also ordered to pay 3,500 in costs and a victim surcharge of 85. Nathan Salmon, the Head of our Criminal Investigations Team, said:

The SIA will always determine who is actually responsible for committing an offence. Those guilty of offences cannot hide behind others. Using Rachel Williams to front his businesses did not protect Mark Pursglove from prosecution

This strong conviction highlights that security regulation exists in order to protect those who use contracted security services and the general public, and ensure, the effectiveness of security businesses that operate within the industry.

Further information:

  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

    The SIA is also on FacebookBarred Security Director To Be Sentenced At Crown Court And Accomplice Sentenced (Security Industry Authority) and TwitterBarred Security Director To Be Sentenced At Crown Court And Accomplice Sentenced (SIAuk).

What can the public sector do to bolster its cyber security?

What Can The Public Sector Do To Bolster Its Cyber Security?

While many organisations in the public sector are going in the right direction, more needs to be done to tackle cyber attacks and prevent breaches . Patching the network is not enough Cyber security is no longer just a matter of protecting data, but also preventing dangerous attacks, which could cost money and or potentially put lives at risk . The WannaCry ransomware attack affected more than 300,000 computers globally1, and heavily disrupted the operations of many major companies and institutions from a variety of sectors. However, one of the worst affected areas was the public sector specifically the NHS . The attack was so severe that hospitals and doctors surgeries from at least 16 health service organisations2 had to turn away patients and cancel appointments, seriously affecting patients wellbeing . The fact that the NHS bore the brunt of the ransomware attack shines a light on the vulnerabilities of the public sector. The threat of a breach cannot be taken lightly, and the need to bolster cyber defences is imperative . The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) recently warned that essential services organisations could face fines of up to 17m or 4%3 of global turnover separate to any fines from GDPR if they fail to protect themselves from cyber-attacks.

>See also: The growing cyber security threat to the UK education sector4 This further reinforces the need for organisations to improve their cybersecurity . The impact of cyber attacks has spurred the Government to act5 and bolster the sector s cyber security systems with a 21m investment, but the right steps must be taken to prevent data breaches altogether.

Criticisms of the NHS and the wider public sector have varied from not replacing old computer systems to not investing in protection from new threats . In the wake of WannaCry, the NHS has attempted to address this in signing a partnership between its digital arm and Microsoft, which will include updates and patches for all computers still using Windows XP. While updating infrastructure will help, more needs to be done to keep data truly safe . Updates and patches are not enough to cover the wide range of factors that cause breaches . One extremely important aspect of cybersecurity is training . If public sector organisations want to prevent attacks like ransomware, which are mostly caused by phishing, they need to ensure that staff have basic cyber-hygiene . This would mean knowing the basics of how to prevent a breach, how to spot potential attacks and taking responsibility for how they conduct themselves around data whether inside or outside of work, as well as understanding the implications of their actions on the organisation. >See also: The public sector and it s approach to the cyber threat landscape6 Despite numerous attacks on firms, this is something that is still neglected .

A recent survey7 of the FTSE 350, by the Government, showed that a shocking 68% of board members had not been trained to deal with cybersecurity incidents. Public sector firms are no exception . The consequences of staff not being cyber-literate is a leading cause of breaches in security, with recent research from CompTIA8 finding that 60% of UK businesses blame human error as a major contributor to security breaches . General carelessness and staff failing to follow policies are the primary contributors, which suggests the lack of knowledge and awareness amongst employees to protect data is a major concern across the board. The NHS therefore needs to expand its cybersecurity practices far beyond simple software updates and patches . It needs to train staff to ensure they can remain secure and avoid leaving data exposed . Organisations must ensure they have all the information to teach staff to stay vigilant against threats . Awareness and knowledge are the best tools to guard against malicious attacks. It is also vital that organisations hire certified IT and security staff to help regulate these processes .

The value of certified staff is clear to see, due to their up-to-date and versatile knowledge of systems, current and emerging technologies . The fact that a CompTIA report reveals that 89%9 of organisations believed that IT-certified individuals were more efficient than non-IT-certified individuals in similar job roles is a testament to their worth to any organisation. >See also: 7 cyber security threats to SMEs and how to secure against them10

The need for cyber security training must involve the entire IT team . It starts with the help desk and technical support personnel, the first line of defence against cyber threats . It extends to the cybersecurity analyst, who uses data analytics to identify potential risks and vulnerabilities so that resources can be allocated where they are most needed before an intrusion happens. While many organisations in the public sector are going in the right direction, more needs to be done to tackle cyber attacks and prevent breaches . Patching the network is not enough . The NHS needs to set an example by making sure that staff are cyber security trained and that IT staff are certified to demonstrate their capabilities . It is imperative that the public sector improves its cybersecurity to prevent attacks like WannaCry ever happening again.

Sourced by Graham Hunter, VP of Europe and Middle East, CompTIA11

References

  1. ^ 300,000 computers globally (www.telegraph.co.uk)
  2. ^ 16 health service organisations (edition.cnn.com)
  3. ^ 17m or 4% (www.bbc.co.uk)
  4. ^ The growing cyber security threat to the UK education sector (www.information-age.com)
  5. ^ spurred the Government to act (healthcare.governmentcomputing.com)
  6. ^ The public sector and it s approach to the cyber threat landscape (www.information-age.com)
  7. ^ survey (www.gov.uk)
  8. ^ research from CompTIA (www.comptia.org)
  9. ^ 89% (certification.comptia.org)
  10. ^ 7 cyber security threats to SMEs and how to secure against them (www.information-age.com)
  11. ^ CompTIA (www.comptia.org)

Security Officer – VSG Security Limited

Security Officer - VSG Security Limited

An opportunity has arisen within one of our security teams based in Stratford. At VSG we supply Security Services to a variety of blue chip clients. We are accredited to the highest standards of security, delivering performance along with general business standards.

We provide services for Manned Guarding, Security Systems, Mobile Security, Secure Event Solutions and Soft Services to all of our clients. As a Security Officer based in one of our clients busy shopping centres you main duty is to ensure the safety and security of the client, their employees and visitors and their premises and property. Other duties will include:

  • Access and Egress Control
  • Authenticating right of access
  • Completing all necessary paperwork & reports
  • Conducting internal & external patrols
  • Following site specific procedures
  • Liaise with clients in a polite and professional manner
  • Maintaining the highest standards of security

The Candidate:

  • Ability to contribute to the team
  • Ability to use the microsoft office suite
  • Ability to use your own initiative
  • Attention to Detail
  • Confident dealing with the public
  • Customer Focussed Approach
  • IT literate
  • Previous Security Experience
  • SIA Licence – Door Supervision
  • Strong Communication Skills

In return, successful candidates will be rewarded with a competitive pay rate, first class training covering multiple skills enabling them to progress within VSG.

They will also receive offers and discounts for numerous high street stores and cinemas across the UK and many other deals and offers. Job Type: Full-time Salary: 9.00 /hour

Required licence or certification:

  • SIA Door Supervisor Licence & CCTV

See more here: Security Officer – VSG Security Limited