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Cyber attack alert: Download security patch

  • Cyber attack alert: Download security patch – PSNI issue warning as Monday cyber attack fears grow across UK

    BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

    Police in Northern Ireland are working closely with government and tech agencies amid fresh warnings that the cyber attack that crippled international services are set to continue. http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/cyber-attack-alert-download-security-patch-psni-issue-warning-as-monday-cyber-attack-fears-grow-across-uk-35713000.html

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/news/article35712644.ece/1faa8/AUTOCROP/h342/PANews%20BT_P-16bfdd3f-944c-4640-a6da-9b368278ce18_I1.jpg

  • Email1

Police in Northern Ireland are working closely with government and tech agencies amid fresh warnings that the cyber attack that crippled international services are set to continue. Europol has warned that the threat “will continue to grow” as people return to work on Monday . Since Friday’s breach more than 200,000 victims – including the NHS – across 150 countries have been infected by the Wanna Decryptor ransomware, also known as WannaCry.

The PSNI has said it has been liaising with relevant agencies “to ensure that here in Northern Ireland we are adequately briefed and prepared for the possibility of any potential similar incident.”

Detective Chief Inspector Douglas Grant said: “Since this attack occurred on Friday afternoon we have been working with representatives from the national government, National Crime Agency, National Cyber Security Centre and cyber security experts to put in place mechanisms to mitigate the risk to systems in Northern Ireland.

“As people return to work tomorrow after the weekend, many will have unopened, potentially infected emails in their inboxes, or their systems may already be infected and are waiting to activate . It is of the utmost importance that individuals and organisations act to ensure the integrity of our local cyber networks and take appropriate action to reduce the threat posed by cyber criminals.”

Read More: Five key questions about the NHS cyber hack answered 2

“While there is currently no suggestion that systems within Northern Ireland have been targeted, we remain conscious that we must act to ensure the integrity of cyber networks and take appropriate action to reduce the threat posed by cyber criminals.

“Do not open emails from unknown sources or containing suspicious links or attachments . Ensure that all computers on your network are fully updated with the latest ‘patches’ . A patch is a piece of software designed to update a computer program or its supporting data, to fix or improve it . This includes fixing security vulnerabilities.”

Speaking to ITV’s Peston on Sunday, Europol director Rob Wainwright said the attack was indiscriminate across the private and public sectors.

“At the moment we are in the face of an escalating threat, the numbers are going up, I am worried about how the numbers will continue to grow when people go to work and turn their machines on Monday morning.

“The latest count is over 200,000 victims in at least 150 countries . Many of those will be businesses including large corporations.”

Organisations across the globe, including investigators from the National Crime Agency (NCA), are now working non-stop to hunt down those responsible for the ransomware.

Meanwhile health authorities are racing to upgrade security software amid fears hackers could exploit the same vulnerability with a new virus. There have been calls for an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding Friday’s major incident, with the Government and NHS chiefs facing questions over their preparedness and the robustness of vital systems. Mr Wainwright explained: “We have been concerned for some time . The healthcare centres in many countries are particularly vulnerable . They are processing a lot of sensitive data.”

A British cyber whiz was hailed an “accidental hero” after he registered a domain name that unexpectedly stopped the spread of the virus, which exploits a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows software.

The anonymous specialist, known only as MalwareTech, prevented more than 100,000 computers across the globe from being infected. On Sunday MalwareTech issued a warning that hackers could upgrade the virus to remove the kill switch.

“Version 1 of WannaCrypt was stoppable but version 2.0 will likely remove the flaw . You’re only safe if you patch ASAP,” he wrote on Twitter.

A number of hospitals in England and Scotland were forced to cancel procedures after dozens of NHS systems were brought down in Friday’s attack. Medical staff reported seeing computers go down “one by one” as the attack took hold, locking machines and demanding money to release the data. Around a fifth of trusts were hit amid concerns networks were left vulnerable because they were still using outdated Windows XP software.

The apparent chink in the NHS’s defences led to criticism of the Government and NHS bosses, with the Liberal Democrats demanding an inquiry takes place. Speaking after a Cobra meeting on Saturday, Home Secretary Amber Rudd admitted “there’s always more” that can be done to protect against viruses. She said: “If you look at who’s been impacted by this virus, it’s a huge variety across different industries and across international governments.

“This is a virus that attacked Windows platforms .

The fact is the NHS has fallen victim to this.

“I don’t think it’s to do with that preparedness . There’s always more we can all do to make sure we’re secure against viruses, but I think there have already been good preparations in place by the NHS to make sure they were ready for this sort of attack.”

Labour’s shadow health secretary, Jonathan Ashworth, in a letter to Mr Hunt, said concerns were repeatedly flagged about outdated computer systems. Speaking to Robert Peston, he demanded that the Conservatives publish the Department of Health’s risk register to see how seriously they were taking IT threats.

Among those affected by the virus was Nissan UK, but the car manufacturer said there had been no major impact.

It is understood its plant in Sunderland is not due to have another production shift until Sunday night.

References

  1. ^ Email (www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk)
  2. ^ Five key questions about the NHS cyber hack answered (www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk)

Security services tapped Ian Paisley’s phone when he was an MP, claims Prescott

The security services tapped the phone of the late Ian Paisley while he was an MP, Lord Prescott has claimed.

The firebrand leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) had his calls tapped despite a long-standing convention that MPs should not have their communications monitored, the former deputy prime minister said. Lord Prescott said then prime minister Tony Blair told him in 2005 that security services had eavesdropped on an MP. He said that after pressing Mr Blair for a name, the then premier told him it was the DUP leader, who later became Northern Ireland’s first minister and a peer before his death in 2014.

Writing in his Sunday Mirror column, Lord Prescott said the surveillance watchdog had wanted to name Mr Paisley but Parliament was not informed.

Lord Prescott said: ” Downing Street had been told by the Interception of Communications Commissioner, who wanted to name Paisley.

“Tony asked me to discuss the Wilson Doctrine with the Speaker of the House of Commons .

I never told him that an MP had been tapped or that it was Paisley.

“Parliament was not informed and Paisley went on to become First Minister of Northern Ireland.

“I can only think that as the peace process was still a concern, mentioning the fact a leading loyalist politician had been tapped by Britain’s security services in the past would not have helped.”

The newspaper said Lord Prescott has decided to break his silence over fears electronic snooping to catch terrorists will lead to an erosion of privacy. The convention that MPs’ communications should not be intercepted by police or security services is known as the Wilson doctrine after former prime minister Harold Wilson, who announced the policy in 1966. In March 2006, Mr Blair assured Parliament the Wilson doctrine would be maintained despite advice to scrap the policy.

The Sunday Mirror said Lord Prescott does not know when Mr Paisley’s phone was tapped or whether MI5, MI6, police or the Army were responsible. He approached then Commons speaker Michael Martin to discuss how the Wilson doctrine was applied but did not mention it was prompted by what he had learned about Mr Paisley. Lord Prescott was concerned a constituent’s private matters could be overheard if spies were listening to MPs’ calls.

In his column, Lord Prescott said he was concerned about the state’s powers of surveillance under Theresa May.

“The challenge as a minister is to balance national security against the freedoms we enjoy,” he said.

“But this government seems determined to ensure Big Brother is not only watching you, he’s monitoring your calls, emails and texts.”

Football manager job security at all-time low, Sky Sports study finds

Last Updated: 24/03/17 9:29am

How long do managers last at the top 92 clubs in England ? We’ve crunched the numbers to reveal the exact average in days… Job security for managers in England’s top four tiers is at an all-time low, a Sky Sports study has found. A remarkable 75 managers were sacked, quit or failed to last after temporary stints in charge last season – the highest total in English football history. In addition, the average tenure for a departing manager last term was an all-time low of just 423 days.

This season, 51 managers have been axed or walked already and the average tenure is just 477 days and, with over three months until July 1st, that number could still drop below that threshold to break a new record. In the first years after the Second World War, managers had an average tenure of more than seven years, with just 20 departing their roles during the 1946/47 season. But even as recently as the start of the Premier League era in 1992/93, managers could expect to be in charge for nearly three years, with just 25 coaches losing their jobs in the first Premier League season. For the study, Sky Sports recorded every manager who has lasted 35 days or more at a current top-four tier club since 1946/47 to work out how long the average boss keeps his job, with the help of Soccerbase.com1 data.

The red line shows how many managers have left a club every season since 1946/47, while the blue line shows the average tenure of departed managers

THIS SEASON’S CASUALTIES

There have been a number of managerial departures this season which have highlighted the insecurity football managers face. Leicester boss Claudio Ranieri was sacked in February 2017, despite leading Leicester to a 5000-1 shock Premier League win last season, while Aitor Karanka – who led Middlesbrough to the top flight last term – left his post last week.

Aitor Karanka was sacked by Middlesbrough this month

Bob Bradley only lasted 85 days at Swansea before receiving his marching orders, while Walter Zenga (Wolves), Kenny Jackett (Rotherham), Alberto Cavasin, Andy Edwards (both Leyton Orient), Russell Slade (Coventry), Chris Brass (Bury), all lasted fewer than 100 days at the helm this term in the lower leagues. Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger is under pressure to step down after a string of poor results, but the Frenchman is unlikely to consider resignation lightly after more than 20 years in charge of the Gunners.

Arsenal fans hold up anti-Wenger signs after the match at West Brom

LONGEST-SERVING MANAGERS

Wenger is England’s longest-serving, active manager and currently holds the 10th-longest reign in our study, which is nearly twice as long as the next longest active tenure, held by Paul Tisdale at Exeter (10 years, nine months). But neither Wenger or Tisdale come close to the all-time record set by Fred Everiss, who was in charge of West Brom between 1902 and 1948 – the longest tenure of any football manager in English history. Meanwhile, Sir Alex Ferguson’s 26-and-a-half-year reign at Old Trafford was the third-longest in our list, ahead of another ex United boss Sir Matt Busby.

Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson and keeper Peter Schmeichel with the trophy after a 2-1 victory over Bayern Munich in 1999

Football Manager Job Security At All-time Low, Sky Sports Study Finds

YOUR CLUB’S AVERAGE MANAGER TENURE

In terms of average tenures at clubs since 1946/47, Manchester United, boosted by Ferguson’s tenure, lead the pack with the average boss lasting 2,346 days. Arsenal have the second longest with 2,172 days, followed by Ipswich (2,007), West Ham (1,916), Liverpool (1,741) and Everton (1,473).

Relative Football League newcomers Morecambe (1,988) and AFC Wimbledon (1,790) also have high averages, due to their recent promotions from non league.

New Notts County manager Kevin Nolan

Football Manager Job Security At All-time Low, Sky Sports Study Finds Meanwhile, Notts County have had more managers than any other current top-four tier club over the last 70 years – appointed 48 managers for more than 35 days and averaging around 500 days at the helm each. Check out the table below to see how many managers your club has appointed…

Football Manager Job Security At All-time Low, Sky Sports Study Finds

References

  1. ^ Soccerbase.com (www.soccerbase.com)