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culture

The biggest challenge in security ?

Human nature

WIRED They say that, on the internet, nobody knows you re a dog1.

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Technology is making it easier to trust strangers2

Technology is making it easier to trust strangers


Or, at least, they used to . As memes go, that image macro of a pup propped up with its paws on a keyboard, masquerading nominally as human, sits somewhere on the Venn diagram between twee , nostalgic and things from the internet your kids don t remember and will judge you for . The 1993 New Yorker cartoonist originally responsible for the gag, Peter Steiner, couldn t possibly have guessed more how hot-button an issue anonymity and trust online would become: as bored script-kiddies, organised crime gangs and multi-billion-dollar government agencies sprouted, flowered and burst like cyber-spores onto an unsuspecting internet targeting everyone and their nan (especially the nans) with schemes designed to exploit trust . The more we rely on devices for the day-to-day running of our lives, the lower we dangle like fruit for criminals. Folks who have been tasked with cybersecurity have been, for the past few decades, building defences using a model of isolation, says Allison Miller, product manager in security and privacy at Google . But what s happening with technology today particularly consumer technology is that we are becoming interconnected.. . People have become the new target . As opposed to, for example, all attackers focusing on getting into sensitive enterprises to get their corporate data, there s a lot of bad behaviour that ends up getting focused on users.

Miller and the Google security team are building the tools that gently (or in some cases, urgently) steer users safely away from sites that might have been designed or compromised to install malware or phish for personal data . Perhaps the most readily familiar example of the team s work is the joltingly all-red Chrome warning screen: the page a user is diverted to should they stray, unwittingly, into dangerous territory. It s an example of why internet users need unseen security teams working on their behalf: as online attack vectors become more and more numerous and sophisticated, the average user can t keep up.

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And that s a problem that doesn t just apply to individuals: while the enormous, household-name internet companies can afford to throw diamond after gold brick at protecting their data (even then not always successfully), smaller companies rely just as heavily on consumer trust, and have to decide how much budget to allocate to it from comparatively thimble-sized pots.

“Institutional trust was not designed for the digital age”


Rachel Botsman

That s the question of the ages: how do you determine how much to invest in security ? says Miller, of the line between protection and paranoia for smaller companies . And that is not something I can answer simply.. . It s worth it to sit down and figure out what is most valuable to you, what you have that might be most valuable to folks who would do ill or might potentially take advantage of you.

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The complexity rises as you go from being an individual to being an organisation, but unfortunately.. . I think large enterprises are in the best position to find experts who will help them identify what s at risk and how to protect it. Whatever their size, companies that misjudge the allocation of resources for security (or are just unlucky) stand to lose more than just client information and money . Data dumps of user info as any former Ashley Madison3 member might tell you also cost companies a second digital currency: trust .

Human nature doesn t scale up well to the company that, through bad luck or negligence, is ultimately responsible for your credit card details ending up on a mile-long list of account numbers and sort codes swapping back and forth on the dark web . We trust companies like we trust friends: you get screwed over once, and it s an uphill battle to win you back. Institutional trust was not designed for the digital age, says Rachel Botsman, author of What s Mine is Yours and the upcoming Who Can You Trust?, on how trust translates into the digital world . If you think of risk mechanisms, whether that be the way we think about government, or regulation, or insurance contracts, they were all designed during the industrial revolution and haven t really evolved that much . So when we talk about institutions rebuilding trust, there is this belief that we can go back to this institutional era of trust that was very opaque, very top-down and very decentralised. The interim solution is already here, albeit in nascent form: trust scores . Ebay, Amazon, Airbnb and TripAdvisor already rely on them . In lieu of knowing a stranger in person, we trust a combination of star ratings, reviews and numbers . The mass decentralisation of the internet forces us not to trust a single stranger, but an aggregate of them: a web of dozens, hundreds or thousands of strangers .

As it is now with the auctioning of celebrity autographs or the buying of an impregnable sub- 20 pop-up tent, so it will be with banks, public institutions maybe even governments. I think these rate and review systems are inevitable, and I think these will be the tools that we use to assess trustworthiness, Botsman says . I m not saying that should be the goal . Trust is highly contextual.

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If the goal is to increase trustworthiness, whether that s a corporation or an individual, you ve basically got two ways of doing that . The old way was through legislation and regulation, which led to more standards and more compliance . I m not saying that s going to go away . But the other option is: how do you provide information that empowers individuals to assess trustworthiness themselves ? And that s what I think we re in the very, very early stages of figuring out. All of which neatly covers two extremes on a spectrum .

If you re a one-person business a consultant or freelance-anything your trust score will be on your CV right below your name . At the other end: if you re a million-or-billion pound enterprise and slip up, there s no cushion like cash . The question is: what about the people in the middle ? Where is the room for experimentation, failure, progress, if the internet s web of strangers turns against your company in its first week? I think that small businesses are in an interesting spot, because they don t necessarily have the investment or the technical expertise of an enterprise, but they have to think like an organisation, says Miller . They have to think in a different way to individuals, and to me: that s where the biggest gap or question mark in cybersecurity is today.

Want to know more about the cyber threats of the future ? WIRED Security 2017 returns to London on September 28 to discuss the latest innovations, trends and threats in enterprise cyber defence, security intelligence and cybersecurity .

Join us at King s Place by booking your tickets today4.

References

  1. ^ nobody knows you re a dog (www.google.co.uk)
  2. ^ Technology is making it easier to trust strangers (www.wired.co.uk)
  3. ^ Ashley Madison (www.wired.co.uk)
  4. ^ booking your tickets today (www.eventbrite.co.uk)

Corporate Receptionist

Corporate Receptionist

Have you got what it takes to be one of our STARS? We are looking for enthusiastic, pro-active, presentable candidates who are keen to work as a Receptionist/FOH staff member and start their career in a corporate environment. As part of our STARS (Security Trained Assistance and Receptionist Services) you will get an opportunity to work at a variety of prestigious, high profile companies across London (mainly in zone 1 and zone 2) and be the first point of contact for all visitors and staff members. An ideal candidate is a person who:

  • Has excellent Customer Service skills
  • Enjoys new challenges and is happy to travel and work at different contracts
  • Has a flexible and helpful nature
  • Takes great pride in personal appearance
  • Loves meeting new people
  • Has a bubbly, confident and charming personality
  • Is passionate about learning and developing

Duties might include:

  • Meeting and greeting visitors in a professional, welcomingand friendly manner
  • Signing-in and out visitors, issuing passes
  • Administrative duties
  • Booking meeting rooms, taxis and couriers
  • Any ad-hoc duties

What can we offer you?

  • Pay rate starst from 10.00 – 15.00 p/h
  • Paid uniform
  • Paid breaks
  • Training: NVQ, First Aid, SIA, Customer Service, Team Leading,
  • Performance based bonuses & work recognition

Our STARS are core of our business and represent the brand through engaging personality, style and professional attitude. We are well known for our culture that aims to ‘ promote within and we are committed to support your growth and provide an access to career development opportunities.Successful applicants must be eligible to work in the UK and able to cover 5 year recent history.If you would like to become one of our STARS, we look forward to hear from you!

Salary: 10.00 /hour

See original article: Corporate Receptionist

Heavy police presence in Hessle as robbers target security van by Barclays bank

Police are hunting robbers who targeted a security van in Hessle1 this afternoon. Witnesses described a heavy police2 presence while Barclays Bank in Ferriby Road has been shut. Police have now confirmed they are looking for a red Renault Clio which raced from the scene at 1.20pm. A spokesman for Humberside Police3 said: “We are currently responding to a robbery of a security van on Ferriby Road, Hessle.

“Shortly before 1.20pm two men approached a security guard near his van and threatened him before stealing a case. “The offenders then left the area in a red Renault Clio . The security guard was unhurt but has been left in shock.

Heavy Police Presence In Hessle As Robbers Target Security Van By Barclays Bank More news: Live as Papas Fish and Chips give away 1p meals4 “Inquiries are underway and anyone with information should call 101 quoting log 277 of 28/03/17.”

Witnesses have described seeing large police activity in the town centre this afternoon. One witness said: “I didn’t see anything and must have missed it by a few minutes . I heard they’re looking for a red car.

“The police still there although only a few cars and police now . The bank is all shut up with shutters down.” Another witness described how the police suddenly descended on the town. She said: “We were in Hessle near the Weir and there was a police car that came and cornered off the bank then about four more vans and cars came .

They are looking for a red Clio in question for a bank robbery.”

More news: Morgan Simmester, 15, banned from Kingswood Retail Park without an adult after crime spree5

References

  1. ^ Hessle (www.hulldailymail.co.uk)
  2. ^ police (www.hulldailymail.co.uk)
  3. ^ Humberside Police (www.hulldailymail.co.uk)
  4. ^ Live as Papas Fish and Chips give away 1p meals (www.hulldailymail.co.uk)
  5. ^ Morgan Simmester, 15, banned from Kingswood Retail Park without an adult after crime spree (www.hulldailymail.co.uk)