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UK National Cyber Security Centre says it is ‘aware of global ransomware incident’

The UK s National Cyber Security Centre says it is aware of a cyber attack spreading around the world amid fears of disruption to infrastructure including banking and transport.

We re aware of the global ransomware incident and are monitoring the situation closely, a spokesperson told The Independent, advising members of the public and businesses to check its website for guidance on keeping their systems secure. British advertising firm WPP said IT systems in several of its companies were affected by the attack, as Maersk employees were sent home from its offices in Berkshire.

The first reports came from Ukraine1, where state infrastructure including government-owned banks, energy firms, transportation and ministers computers were hit by the ransomware. Russian oil giant Rosneft, the world s largest shipping company Maersk and firms in India and Norway were among those affected.

Infected computers display a message demanding a payment of $300 ( 235) in Bitcoin to re-gain access to encrypted files. The Swiss government s Reporting and Analysis Centre said the Petya virus 2was believed to be responsible and was spreading by exploiting the SMB (Server Message Block) vulnerability . A message demanding money is seen on a monitor of a payment terminal at a branch of Ukraine’s state-owned bank Oschadbank after a wave of cyber attacks, in Kiev, Ukraine, June 27, 2017. (Reuters)

Petya was previously blamed for disrupting systems in 2016 and works similarly to the WannaCry ransomware that infected more than 230,000 computers in 150 countries last month.

Maersk said its IT systems were down across multiple sites and businesses due to a cyber attack that could affect its global operations. Employees at Maersk s main UK office in Maidenhead said all staff had been locked out of their computers and sent home for the day. The Danish business congolmerate is the largest container shipping company in the world and also operates in the oil and gas sectors.

Seventeen shipping container terminals run by Maersk subsidiary APM Terminals have also been hacked, including two in Rotterdam and 15 in other parts of the world, according to Dutch television. Norway s national security agency said the ransomware was affecting an unnamed international company in the country. Rosneft, a Russian government-owned oil firm, said it was also targeted by a massive hacker attack on its servers, as was steel maker Evraz.

Ukraine s national bank, state power company and largest airport were among the targets first reported targets on Tuesday. The website of Boryspil International Airport during a cyber attack targeting Ukrainian infrastructure on 27 June 2017

Rozenko Pavlo, the deputy Prime Minister, said he and other members of the government were unable to access their computers. Ukrainian state-run aircraft manufacturer Antonov was among the companies hit, along with state power distributor Ukrenergo, which said the attack did not affect power supplies.

The National Bank of Ukraine said an unknown virus was to blame, saying several unnamed Ukrainian banks were affected along with financial firms.

As a result of cyber attacks, these banks have difficulties with customer service and banking operations, a statement said.

The National Bank bank is confident that the banking infrastructure’s defence against cyber fraud is properly set up and attempted cyber attacks on banks’ IT systems will be neutralised. Computers and departure boards for Boryspil International Airport in Kiev the largest in Ukraine were also down. The Ukrposhta state postal service, television stations and transport were affected by the attack, which left Kiev metro passengers unable to pay using bank cards.

Many ATMs were disabled, displaying the message left by hackers, as were tills in supermarkets. Emails hit as Parliament targeted by cyber security attack

Ukraine has blamed Russia for repeated cyber attacks targeting crucial infrastructure during the past three years, including one on its power grid that left part of western Ukraine temporarily without electricity in December 2015. Russia has denied involvement and the orchestrators of Tuesday s attack were not known, although onlookers estimated they could make billions of dollars from the hack.

The UK s Houses of Parliament were targeted in a separate attack 3on Friday that compromised up to 90 accounts as part of efforts to access the accounts of MPs, peers and their staff by searching for weak passwords.

The growth of global cyber attacks, including those targeting the election campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Emmanuel Macron, have sparked warnings of a permanent war online.4

Guillaume Poupard, director general of the National Cybersecurity Agency of France (ANSSI) said intensifying attacks were coming from unspecified states, as well as criminal and extremist groups.

We must work collectively, not just with two or three Western countries, but on a global scale, he added, saying attacks could aim at espionage, fraud, sabotage or destruction.

We are getting closer, clearly, to a state of war – a state of war that could be more complicated, probably, than those we’ve known until now.

UK National Cyber Security Centre Says It Is 'aware Of Global Ransomware Incident'Reuse content5

References

  1. ^ The first reports came from Ukraine (www.independent.co.uk)
  2. ^ Petya virus (www.independent.co.uk)
  3. ^ Houses of Parliament were targeted in a separate attack (www.independent.co.uk)
  4. ^ sparked warnings of a permanent war online. (www.independent.co.uk)
  5. ^ Reuse content (www.independent.co.uk)

Donald Trump: President hails ‘victory for national security’ as US court reinstates travel ban

  • 1/66 20 January 2017

    Donald Trump (L) is sworn in as the 45th US president by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts in front of the Capitol in Washington

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 2/66 20 January 2017

    First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump,former President Barack Obama, Michelle Obama at the US Capitol after inauguration ceremonies at the in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

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    US President Donald Trump takes the oath of allegiance during his swearing-in ceremony on January 20, 2017 at the US Capitol in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 4/66 20 January 2017

    US President elect Donald Trump (C) arrives for the swearing-in ceremony on in front of the Capitol in Washington

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 5/66 20 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania walk the inaugural parade route with son Barron on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 6/66 20 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump and the first lady Melania Trump dance at the Liberty Ball at the Washington DC Convention Center following Donald Trump’s inauguration as the 45th President of the United States, in Washington, DC, on 20 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 7/66 20 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump and the first lady Melania Trump dance at the Armed Services ball at the National Building museum following Donald Trump’s inauguration as the 45th President of the United States, in Washington, DC, on 20 January 20, 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 8/66 20 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he waits at his desk before signing conformations for General James Mattis as US Secretary of Defense and General John Kelly as US Secretary of Homeland Security, as Vice President Mike Pence and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus look on in the Oval Office of the White House on 20 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 9/66 20 January 2017

    Police pepper spray at anti-Trump protesters during clashes in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 10/66 20 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump (C) gestures as the first lady Melania Trump (center L), Vice Presidant Mike Pence (L), his wife Karen (2L) and family look on at the Liberty Ball at the Washington DC Convention Center following Donald Trump’s inauguration as the 45th President of the United States, in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 11/66 20 January 2017

    Vanessa and Donald Trump Jr, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner salute the crowd after dancing on stage during the Freedom ball at the Walter E . Washington Convention Center on 20 January 2017 in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 12/66 21 January 2017

    Demonstrators gather at Civic Center Park in Denver, Colorado, during the Women’s March on 21 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 13/66 21 January 2017

    Demonstrators protest near the White House in Washington, DC, for the Women’s March on 21 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 14/66 23 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump holds up an executive order withdrawing the US from the Trans-Pacific Partnership after signing it in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on 23 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 15/66 25 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, DC, on 25 January 2017

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  • 16/66 25 January 2017

    Greenpeace protesters unfold a banner reading “Resist” from atop a construction crane behind the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 17/66 26 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump salutes as he steps off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland upon his return from Philadelphia

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  • 18/66 26 January 2017

    Demonstrators protest President Donald Trump’s plan to build a border wall along the United States and Mexico border in Chicago, Illinois

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 19/66 27 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May speak during a press conference at the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 20/66 27 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks after signing executive orders alongside US Defense Secretary James Mattis (R) and US Vice President Mike Pence on 27 January 2017, at the Pentagon in Washington, DC

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  • 21/66 27 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks following the ceremonial swearing-in of James Mattis as secretary of defense on January 27, 2017, at the Pentagon in Washington, DC

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  • 22/66 28 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin from the Oval Office of the White House on January 28, 2017, in Washington, DC. AFP/Getty Images

  • 23/66 31 January 2017

    Senior Advisor Jared Kushner (L) and Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly (R) listen while US President Donald Trump puts his papers away at the beginning of a meeting on cyber security in the Roosevelt Room of the White House January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 24/66 28 January 2017

    US President Donald Trump holds an executive memorandum on defeating the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria after signing it in the Oval Office of the White House

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  • 25/66 31 January 2017

    Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks, after US President Donald Trump nominated him for the Supreme Court, at the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 26/66 31 January 2017

    Demonstrators gather outside of The United States Supreme Court after President Donald Trump announced Neil Gorsuch as his nominee to fill the seat of former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Antonin Scalia in Washington, DC, on 31 January 2017

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 27/66 1 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump (2L) congratulates Rex Tillerson (seated) after he was sworn in as Secretary of State as his wife Renda St . Clair (R), and Vice President Mike Pence (L) look on in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 28/66 1 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump and his daughter Ivanka walk to board Marine One at the White House in Washington, DC

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  • 29/66 3 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump chats with reporters on board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, bound for Palm Beach, Florida

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  • 30/66 4 February 2017

    Zeina, who did not want to give her last name, takes part in a protest against US President Donald Trump outside the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 31/66 4 February 2017

    Demonstrators holding placards take part in a protest against US President Donald Trump outside the US Embassy in London

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  • 32/66 6 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump sits down for lunch with troops during a visit to the US Central Command at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida

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  • 33/66 7 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump holds up a gift given to him by county sheriffs following a meeting as they pose for photos in the Oval Office of the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 34/66 13 February 2017

    National Security Advisor Michael Flynn (centre) attends a joint press conference by US President Donald Trump and Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in the East Room of the White House on 13 February 2017 in Washington

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 35/66 15 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump (R) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu walk into the White House in Washington, DC

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  • 36/66 15 February 2017

    Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner arrive for a joint press conference by US President Donald Trump and Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the East Room of the White House

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  • 37/66 15 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump welcome Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, as they arrive at the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 38/66 16 February 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks during a press conference at the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 39/66 26 February 2017

    An activist paints the wall between the United States and Mexico during a demonstration against US President Donald Trump on the border of Ciudad Juarez with Nuevo Mexico, Chihuahua State, Mexico

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 40/66 26 February 2017

    View of the paintings made by activists in the wall between Mexico and United States during a demontration against US President Donald Trump on the border of Ciudad Juarez with Nuevo Mexico, Chihuahua State, Mexico

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 41/66 27 February 2017

    Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway (L) checks her phone after taking a photo as US President Donald Trump and leaders of historically black universities and colleges pose for a group photo in the Oval Office of the White House before a meeting with US Vice President Mike Pence in Washington

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 42/66 28 February 2017

    US Vice President Mike Pence (L), US President Donald Trump (C) and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) clap during a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 43/66 2 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump salutes as he arrives onboard the pre-commissioned USS Gerald R . Ford aircraft carrier in Newport News, Virginia

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  • 44/66 2 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump salutes as he walks to Air Force One prior to departing from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia

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  • 45/66 3 March 2017

    Sandy Adams holds up a placard during a protest outside St .

    Anthony Catholic school in Orlando, Florida during a visit by US President Donald Trump

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  • 46/66 3 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump walks off Air Force One after arriving in Orlando, Florida

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 47/66 7 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump gestures as he surprises visitors during the official reopening of public tours at the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 48/66 10 March 2017

    People rally during the Native Nations Rise protest in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 49/66 15 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Nashville, Tennessee

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 50/66 17 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel shake hands after a press conference in the East Room of the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 51/66 20 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump arrives for a ‘Make America Great Again’ rally at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Kentucky

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  • 52/66 21 March 2017

    S President Donald Trump reacts after signing a bill increasing funding for NASA in the Oval Office at the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 53/66 23 March 2017

    Protesters dressed as medical staff march towards the Federal Building during a “Save the Affordable Care Act” rally in Los Angeles, California

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  • 54/66 23 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump sits in the drivers seat of a semi-truck as he welcomes truckers and CEOs to the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 55/66 23 March 2017

    Health care activists hold placards during a rally at Freedom Plaza during a protest in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 56/66 28 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump (C) speaks before signing the Energy Independence Executive Order at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Headquarters in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 57/66 28 March 2017

    Surrounded by miners from Rosebud Mining, US President Donald Trump (C) signs he Energy Independence Executive Order at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Headquarters in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 58/66 29 March 2017

    US President Donald Trump addresses the Womens Empowerment Panel in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 59/66 1 April 2017

    People wearing masks of US President Donald Trump take part in the 32nd Annual April Fools Day Parade in New York

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 60/66 3 April 2017

    Translators watch as Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi (L) and US President Donald Trump shake hands in the Oval Office before a meeting at the White House

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 61/66 6 April 2017

    US President Donald Trump (L) sits with Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) during a bilateral meeting at the Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach, Florida

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 62/66 6 April 2017

    Donald Trump is in a meeting with his National Security team and being briefed by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford via secure video teleconference after a missile strike on Syria while inside the Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility at his Mar-a-Lago resort in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S .

    on April 6, 2017

    The White House via Reuters

  • 63/66 15 April 2017

    A man gets sprayed with a chemical irritant as multiple fights break out between Trump supporters and anti-Trump protesters in Berkeley, California

    AFP/Getty Images

  • 64/66 15 April 2017

    Protestors take part in the “Tax March” to call on US President Donald Trump to release his tax records in Los Angeles, California

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  • 65/66 17 April 2017

    US First Lady Melania Trump walks to the Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House

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  • 66/66 17 April 2017

    Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Trump and son Barron Trump attend the annual Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House

    EPA

  • How climate change will threaten food security of world’s poorest countries

    Some of the world s poorest countries will be hit hardest as climate change affects marine fisheries all over the world, according to a new study. The global fishing industry produces a total catch worth of about $90bn ( 71bn) but the warming ocean temperatures are causing many valuable species to shift their usual ranges. The potential for water to hit temperatures lethal to corals such as Australia s Great Barrier Reef, which support vast amounts of other marine life, is a particular problem.

    The researchers assessed 147 countries based on their vulnerability to the effect of future warming on fishing in their waters and their ability to cope with the changes. The worst-affected countries were mostly small islands, with Kiribati, Micronesia, the Solomon Islands, the Maldives and Vanuatu making up the top five, according to a paper in the journal PLOS ONE1. However, large countries like China, in eighth place, Nigeria (15th) and Indonesia (26th) also featured high on the list.

    Ireland was predicted to be the least vulnerable country in 147th place, followed by Chile, the UK, Iceland and Namibia, with the US in sixth. The five worst-affected countries were given a vulnerability score that was eight to nine times higher than those at the bottom of the list. Writing in the journal, the researchers warned that climate change s effect on fisheries could harm food security, people s livelihoods and public health particularly in poor countries that are less able to cope.

    More than 87 per cent of least developed countries are found within the top half of the vulnerability index, while the bottom half includes all but one of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development member states wealthy countries, they said.

    This is primarily due to the tremendous variation in countries adaptive capacity, as no such trends are evident from the exposure or sensitivity indices.

    And the countries that have done the least to cause climate change appear to be the ones that can expect their fisheries to be the worst affected by it.

    A negative correlation exists between vulnerability and per capita carbon emissions, and the clustering of states at different levels of development across the vulnerability index suggests growing barriers to meeting global commitments to reducing inequality, promoting human well-being and ensuring sustainable cities and communities, the researchers wrote.

    How Climate Change Will Threaten Food Security Of World's Poorest CountriesReuse content2

    References

    1. ^ a paper in the journal PLOS ONE (journals.plos.org)
    2. ^ Reuse content (www.independent.co.uk)