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Security is stepped up at William and Kate’s Kensington Palace home amid fears of terror attacks

Security has been stepped up at Kensington Palace1 amid fears of terror attacks.2

Visitors to the west London palace, once home to Princess Diana3 , must now have their bags checked every time they enter the cafe and gift shop in measures introduced after the UK threat level was briefly raised to critical.

The palace is home to William and Kate and their children as well as Prince Harry4 .

However, the recent changes concern the public areas of the building where an estimated 400,000 visitors flock every year.

The new measures come after the UK threat level temporarily increased Tourists must now have their bags checked every time they go into the cafe or gift shop

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The palace is currently home to the exhibition Diana: Her Fashion Story which is attracting high volumes of visitors as people remember the princess on the 20th anniversary of her death. It also hosts an exhibition on Queen Victoria and offers the chance to view Royal Collection artwork in The King s Gallery. A sign outside the cafe and shop now reads: Please wait here for mandatory bag searches and security checks.

Please note that bags will be searched upon every re-entry of the palace cafe.

A source said the measures were introduced in May after the threat level was briefly raised to critical following the Manchester bombing5 and remain in place despite the threat level since being lowered.

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Princess Diana once called Kensington Palace her home Kensington Palace is currently showing the exhibition Diana: Her Fashion Story

It currently remains at the second highest level of severe meaning at attack is highly likely . It is not known if security surrounding the royals has also been stepped up as this information is never made public by royal officials or the MET Police. Bag searches are also in place at other sites managed by Historic Royal Palaces including the Tower of London.

A Historic Royal Palaces spokesperson said: The safety and security of our visitors is our highest priority.

We have a range of security measures in place across our sites, which are subject to constant review based on the information available to us.

We continue to review our existing security arrangements and, where appropriate, put in place additional measures.

References

  1. ^ Kensington Palace (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ terror attacks. (www.mirror.co.uk)
  3. ^ Princess Diana (www.mirror.co.uk)
  4. ^ Prince Harry (www.mirror.co.uk)
  5. ^ Manchester bombing (www.mirror.co.uk)

Manchester Arndale evacuated as UK on alert

Manchester’s Arndale Centre has been evacuated, with people seen running away screaming and witnesses saying a man was arrested by armed police.

“Security guards and police who were armed shouted at people to get away,” said Sky’s Mike McCarthy, at the scene. “At least 100 people came round the corner – many of them screaming and trying to get away.” Some people fell over in the rush to get away and police with sniffer dogs went inside the shopping centre, said McCarthy. Police said they do not think it was related to the incident at Manchester Arena and the centre has now reopened.

Image: Some people were in tears as the shopping centre was evacuated

The evacuation happened around 12 hours after a bomb attack killed 22 people at a concert at the arena.1 :: Live updates – Manchester attack2 Extra armed police are on UK streets after the attack, with a high state of alert seeing a suspicious item blown up in Manchester in the early hours.

Image: People leave the Arndale Centre after it was evacuated

A controlled explosion took place just after 1.30am in Cathedral Gardens, near the site of the attack, but it later turned out to be a pile of abandoned clothing.

:: Security services think they know who bomber is3 Another suspicious item sparked an evacuation of London’s Victoria coach station around 6.40am. Passengers were moved to the end of the street as the area was cordoned off and buses diverted . However, the alert was called off shortly after 8am.

Image: Cars arriving at Manchester United’s training ground were also searched

Manchester United players arriving at the team’s Carrington training ground have also had their cars searched. Security staff used mirrors to check underneath vehicles and opened up the boots. The team are getting set for Wednesday’s Europa League final against Ajax in Stockholm.

:: Manchester Arena witness: ‘It was absolute carnage’4

A “mix of armed and unarmed officers” were called up for the rush hour in London, with Met Police chief Cressida Dick saying they would “continue for as long as is needed”. Police Scotland said more armed officers would be at “transport hubs and crowded places”. Policing in crowded places is also being reviewed in the West Midlands, Norfolk, Suffolk, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire and Essex. Extra armed officers were called up in London and other cities after the Westminster attack in March and the Berlin attack in December. The threat from international terrorism in the UK remains “severe” – as it has been since August 2014 – meaning an attack is highly likely.

References

  1. ^ bomb attack killed 22 people at a concert at the arena. (news.sky.com)
  2. ^ Live updates – Manchester attack (news.sky.com)
  3. ^ Security services think they know who bomber is (news.sky.com)
  4. ^ Manchester Arena witness: ‘It was absolute carnage’ (news.sky.com)

NHS cyberattack: security expert accidentally flicks the ‘kill switch’ on the ransomware

Getty Images / UniversalImagesGroup / Contributor Update 13.05.2017: The NHS cyberattack appears to be slowing down after a security researcher says he “accidentally” hit the kill switch on the ransomware . Writing on the blog @malwaretechblog, the unnamed malware expert registered a domain name used by Wanna Decryptor, or WannaCrypt, and inadvertently killed it . The National
Cyber Security Centre then repurposed the blog1 to spread the message.

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Original story The NHS cyberattack that hit hospitals across the UK is said to have been part of the biggest ransomware outbreak in history, according to Mikko Hypponen from F-Secure. Viruses, trojans, malware, worms – what’s the difference?2

Viruses, trojans, malware, worms – what’s the difference?


Commenting on the news, Hypponen said the Wanna Decryptor attack was unprecedented, while cyber security expert Varun Badwhar said it gave a glimpse of what a “cyber-apocalypse” would look like.

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“We’ve never seen something spread this quickly in a 24-hour period across this many countries and continents,” explained Badwhar. “So it’s definitely one of those things we’ve always heard about that could happen and now we’re seeing it play out.”

The NHS hack is said to be creeping across the UK with reports of the ransomware attack hitting a range of other organisations in as many as 99 countries . In a statement, NHS Digital3 confirmed a number of NHS organisations had been affected by a ransomware attack . The investigation is at an early stage but we believe the malware variant is Wanna Decryptor4, a spokesperson said.

Subscribe to WIRED5

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At this stage, we do not have any evidence that patient data has been accessed . We will continue to work with affected organisations to confirm this. Hackers use ransomware6 to infect a computer or system before holding files hostage until a ransom is paid . It can infect a computer via a trojan, virus or worm. Wanna Decryptor encrypts users files using AES and RSA encryption ciphers meaning the hackers can directly decrypt system files using a unique decryption key . Victims may be sent ransom notes with instructions in the form of !Please Read Me!.txt files, linking to ways of contacting the cybercriminals .

Wanna Decryptor changes the computer’s wallpaper with messages (as seen in tweets from affected NHS sites) asking the victim to download a decryptor from Dropbox . This decryptor demands hundreds in bitcoin7 to work. Affected machines are said to have six hours to pay, and every few hours the ransom goes up. “Most folks that have paid up appear to have paid the initial $300 in the first few hours,” said Kurt Baumgartner, principal security researcher at Kaspersky Lab. They added that the attack was not specifically targeted at the NHS because it is affecting “organisations from across a range of sectors” and NHS Digital is working with the National Cyber Security Centre, the Department of Health and NHS England to support affected organisations. The NHS incident appears to be part of a global cybersecurity incident with malware spreading to multiple organisations around the world . Security firm Check Point and Avast have said there have been 75,000 attacks in 99 countries . Telefonica in Spain has been the biggest confirmed incident outside of the UK but it also reports issues in Russia, Turkey, Indonesia, Vietnam, Japan, and Germany.

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A spokesman for the National Cyber Security Centre8 and National Crime Agency said they were responding to an “ongoing international cyber incident” and confirmed there was no indication medical data or personal information has been compromised.” The specialist cyber crime officers from the NCA and police forces are now working with hospitals to respond to the attack preserve evidence . Read their advice on protecting yourself from ransomware9. A live map10 tracking the malware has plotted thousands of incidents around the world . Although, it is not confirmed these are all the latest version of the malware . This map tracks incidents of wcrypt and reveals how many of the botnets are online, and offline, in real-time . A Unique IP chart below the map reveals the number of new botnets coming online, and the total . As of 7.17pm BST, there were 189 new, and 1,821 total botnets (up from nine just an hour earlier.) It is said that 24 NHS organisations have been hit .

The full list is below:

  • Mid Essex Clinical Commissioning Group
  • Wingate Medical Centre
  • NHS Liverpool Community Health NHS Trust
  • East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust in Nuneaton, Warwickshire
  • Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
  • St Barts Health NHS Trust
  • Derbyshire Community Health Services
  • East and North Hertfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group
  • East and North Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Sherwood Forest NHS Trust
  • Nottinghamshire Healthcare
  • Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Colchester General Hospital
  • Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust
  • North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust
  • Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Morecombe Bay NHS Trust
  • University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust
  • NHS Hampshire Hospitals
  • Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

References

  1. ^ blog (www.ncsc.gov.uk)
  2. ^ Viruses, trojans, malware, worms – what’s the difference? (www.wired.co.uk)
  3. ^ NHS Digital (digital.nhs.uk)
  4. ^ Wanna Decryptor (www.wired.co.uk)
  5. ^ Subscribe to WIRED (www.wired.co.uk)
  6. ^ ransomware (wired.uk)
  7. ^ bitcoin (www.wired.co.uk)
  8. ^ National Cyber Security Centre (www.wired.co.uk)
  9. ^ protecting yourself from ransomware (www.ncsc.gov.uk)
  10. ^ live map (intel.malwaretech.com)