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Durham

Reference Library – England – Durham

12m security bill for North East hospitals as thousands of staff and patients are attacked

Health bosses have spent more than 12million on security in the last five years amid a rise in attacks on NHS staff and patients. A total of 4,249 physical and non-verbal assaults were recorded at hospitals in the North East between April 2012 and March last year – an average of two a day.

NHS1 chiefs said attacks on its workers and patients were completely unacceptable . Figures released through a Freedom of Information request show The Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust spent 5,083,009 on security during the five years.

And the trust, which runs Royal Victoria Infirmary2 and Freeman Hospital3, recorded 208 physical incidents in 2012, but this rose to 249 five years later – a 20% increase. A trust spokesman said: The safety of our patients and staff is the trust s first priority and we take any incidents of aggression or violence towards staff very seriously.

The trust s annual security spend covers the security provision for all of our hospital sites and we have a number of schemes in place to help maintain the safety and wellbeing of our patients and staff.

Read More

The County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, which spent 3,107,252 on security, saw a huge 61% increase in the number of physical attacks at its hospitals. It recorded 147 incidents in 2012/13 but 238 assaults were reported five years later.

The RVI in Newcastle

A trust spokesman said: Our security team works around the clock, seven days a week, and has a number of responsibilities, principally protecting our buildings and facilities across several sites.

No one should ever feel at risk of attack while at work and we take the safety of our colleagues very seriously . We have policies, guidance and support in place designed to ensure they are kept as safe as possible.

We also have robust processes for the occasions when they feel threatened to give them appropriate help and support quickly. The figures show the City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust spent 3,073,082 on security over five years, while 699 physical and non-verbal attacks were reported.

Meanwhile, the South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust said its security budget is set a 400,000 a year, meaning it could have spent up to 2m between April 2012 and March last year. During this period, health bosses recorded 553 incidents at its hospitals.

Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Gateshead

A joint statement from the South Tyneside and Sunderland Healthcare Group, which runs hospital services in South Tyneside and Sunderland, said: The safety and security of our patients, visitors and staff is always a priority and we have security measures in place 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at South Tyneside District Hospital4, Sunderland Royal Hospital and Sunderland Eye Infirmary.

We do not tolerate violent or abusive behaviour of any kind across our organisations and take a very proactive approach to make sure that we meet the highest security standards and protect people within our care.

The majority of security incidents reported are minor, but we have robust security procedures in place to ensure that any incident can be dealt with quickly and by working closely with the police where necessary.

Read More

The figures also revealed Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, spent 1.504,692 on security and recorded 780 incidents. Andy Colwell, who manages facilities and security at QE Gateshead, said: Our security team play a vital role in the hospital in protecting staff from abuse, but also providing support and assistance to the public.

It s important to note that a large proportion of violence against NHS staff in Gateshead is by patients who are unwell with diminished capability, so we need to provide specialist support, training and the appropriate level of intervention and protection .

At the hospital we also have a full range of panic alarms, security equipment and CCTV to help ensure the safety of staff and the public.

The Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust refused to disclose how much money it spent on security.

References

  1. ^ NHS (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  2. ^ Royal Victoria Infirmary (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  3. ^ Freeman Hospital (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  4. ^ South Tyneside District Hospital (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)

12m security bill for North East hospitals as thousands of staff and …

Health bosses have spent more than 12million on security in the last five years amid a rise in attacks on NHS staff and patients. A total of 4,249 physical and non-verbal assaults were recorded at hospitals in the North East between April 2012 and March last year – an average of two a day.

NHS1 chiefs said attacks on its workers and patients were completely unacceptable . Figures released through a Freedom of Information request show The Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust spent 5,083,009 on security during the five years.

And the trust, which runs Royal Victoria Infirmary2 and Freeman Hospital3, recorded 208 physical incidents in 2012, but this rose to 249 five years later – a 20% increase. A trust spokesman said: The safety of our patients and staff is the trust s first priority and we take any incidents of aggression or violence towards staff very seriously.

The trust s annual security spend covers the security provision for all of our hospital sites and we have a number of schemes in place to help maintain the safety and wellbeing of our patients and staff.

Read More

The County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, which spent 3,107,252 on security, saw a huge 61% increase in the number of physical attacks at its hospitals. It recorded 147 incidents in 2012/13 but 238 assaults were reported five years later.

The RVI in Newcastle

A trust spokesman said: Our security team works around the clock, seven days a week, and has a number of responsibilities, principally protecting our buildings and facilities across several sites.

No one should ever feel at risk of attack while at work and we take the safety of our colleagues very seriously . We have policies, guidance and support in place designed to ensure they are kept as safe as possible.

We also have robust processes for the occasions when they feel threatened to give them appropriate help and support quickly. The figures show the City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust spent 3,073,082 on security over five years, while 699 physical and non-verbal attacks were reported.

Meanwhile, the South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust said its security budget is set a 400,000 a year, meaning it could have spent up to 2m between April 2012 and March last year. During this period, health bosses recorded 553 incidents at its hospitals.

Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Gateshead

A joint statement from the South Tyneside and Sunderland Healthcare Group, which runs hospital services in South Tyneside and Sunderland, said: The safety and security of our patients, visitors and staff is always a priority and we have security measures in place 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at South Tyneside District Hospital4, Sunderland Royal Hospital and Sunderland Eye Infirmary.

We do not tolerate violent or abusive behaviour of any kind across our organisations and take a very proactive approach to make sure that we meet the highest security standards and protect people within our care.

The majority of security incidents reported are minor, but we have robust security procedures in place to ensure that any incident can be dealt with quickly and by working closely with the police where necessary.

Read More

The figures also revealed Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, spent 1.504,692 on security and recorded 780 incidents. Andy Colwell, who manages facilities and security at QE Gateshead, said: Our security team play a vital role in the hospital in protecting staff from abuse, but also providing support and assistance to the public.

It s important to note that a large proportion of violence against NHS staff in Gateshead is by patients who are unwell with diminished capability, so we need to provide specialist support, training and the appropriate level of intervention and protection .

At the hospital we also have a full range of panic alarms, security equipment and CCTV to help ensure the safety of staff and the public.

The Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust refused to disclose how much money it spent on security.

References

  1. ^ NHS (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  2. ^ Royal Victoria Infirmary (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  3. ^ Freeman Hospital (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)
  4. ^ South Tyneside District Hospital (www.chroniclelive.co.uk)

Jailed unlicensed security director ordered to pay over £63,000 from proceeds of crime

On 9 December 2017 at Teesside Crown Court, jailed security director Christopher Catchpole, was ordered to pay back proceeds of crime amounting to 63,628.

Catchpole, formerly of Pro-Lock Security Limited based in Durham, had previously been sentenced to 32 months in prison at Teesside Crown Court in June 2017. He was convicted of money laundering, supplying an unlicensed security operative and acting as the director of a security company without an SIA licence. The judge gave Catchpole three months to pay. He faces an extra nine months in prison if he fails to produce the money, which will be raised by the sale of property belonging to Catchpole and his wife. Our Director of Partnerships and Interventions, Dave Humphries, said:

The successful results of this prosecution will reassure the public that we will continue to work with the police to ensure compliance with the law.

It is important that Mr Catchpole was pursued under Proceeds of Crime legislation, to recover the benefit he gleaned from his actions.

The successful conclusion of the case was the result of a lengthy investigation involving the SIA and the North East Regional Asset Recovery Team (RART). The North East RART used their powers under the Private Security Industry Act to obtain information relating to the conduct of Catchpole and his security business. In support, the SIA investigation team provided evidence in court that Catchpole s activities had deprived legitimate security companies of 1.1 million of business.

Detective Sergeant Thomas Maughan, from the North East Regional Asset Recovery Team, said:

We are very pleased with the outcome today, which involved fantastic partnership work between ourselves, the North East Regional Special Operations Unit, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), the Security Industry Authority (SIA) and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS).

“Christopher Catchpole s company, Pro-Lock Security, has traded illegally from the outset. Although his companies received more than 1million since 2013, his illegal trading started years before. He requested a SIA licence application but never applied. He has showed a complete disregard for SIA licencing which exists to keep such people out of the private security business, so the public are not put at risk. Catchpole is also subject to a Serious Crime Prevention Order, which will come into effect once he is released from prison. The order includes a condition that he must not have a role in any business relating to security.

Further information:

  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. The SIA’s main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk.

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